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Here’s Why Chefs Are Freaking Out Over Ramps

Here’s Why Chefs Are Freaking Out Over Ramps


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Find out more on this coveted farmers market pick

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The appearance of ramps at your local farmers market can only mean one thing: Spring is finally here! As we move into early April, the dull and muddy landscape around us starts to transform into a vibrant and lush garden. This new season brings a certain freshness that we start to crave after a long winter filled with root vegetables and roasted squash.

Spring brings a wave of energy, life, and, most importantly, ramps. What are ramps, you may be asking? They belong to the allium family; look similar to baby leeks, and taste as if garlic and scallions had a baby. Chefs freak out over this foraged crop because of its limited supply and gentle oniony flavor.

Ramps are truly something special. They can be folded into scrambled eggs, turned into a pesto, grilled with just a little salt and olive oil, or pickled to preserve them for later. They are so delicate in flavor that they can even be eaten raw.

Unfortunately, the delicate vegetable only makes an appearance from April to June, and because ramps grow wild but are difficult to cultivate, they are usually on the pricier side. They can be found at your local farmers market if you live in the eastern United States — so if you are lucky enough to find these little beauties, make sure to grab some. Ramps are also as good for you as they are delicious. Keep this in mind next time you are looking for 22 superfoods you need to stay healthy this spring.


Ramps: How to Forage & Eat Wild Leeks

Ramps, ramsons or wild leeks, are one of the earliest wild edibles to emerge, and, for some, they're the holy grail of wild edibles.

They're really a type of wild onion with a unique garlicky-onion flavor, which some people find overwhelming. Most folks either love them or despise them.

Some internet sources say they look like scallions, but they look nothing like scallions.

Ramp leaves are flat and much broader than their bulbs, whereas scallion leaves are hollow and narrow -- about the same width of their bulbs.

For one, their distinct pungent flavor can't be rivaled by anything that is commercially cultivated.

Secondly, they're only available for a very short window in the spring.

Historically ramps were considered a spring tonic in the Appalachians.

Early settlers looked forward to harvesting them after long, hungry winters, as it would have been one of the first vegetables they had eaten in months.

Sustainably harvested ramps.


Ramps: How to Forage & Eat Wild Leeks

Ramps, ramsons or wild leeks, are one of the earliest wild edibles to emerge, and, for some, they're the holy grail of wild edibles.

They're really a type of wild onion with a unique garlicky-onion flavor, which some people find overwhelming. Most folks either love them or despise them.

Some internet sources say they look like scallions, but they look nothing like scallions.

Ramp leaves are flat and much broader than their bulbs, whereas scallion leaves are hollow and narrow -- about the same width of their bulbs.

For one, their distinct pungent flavor can't be rivaled by anything that is commercially cultivated.

Secondly, they're only available for a very short window in the spring.

Historically ramps were considered a spring tonic in the Appalachians.

Early settlers looked forward to harvesting them after long, hungry winters, as it would have been one of the first vegetables they had eaten in months.

Sustainably harvested ramps.


Ramps: How to Forage & Eat Wild Leeks

Ramps, ramsons or wild leeks, are one of the earliest wild edibles to emerge, and, for some, they're the holy grail of wild edibles.

They're really a type of wild onion with a unique garlicky-onion flavor, which some people find overwhelming. Most folks either love them or despise them.

Some internet sources say they look like scallions, but they look nothing like scallions.

Ramp leaves are flat and much broader than their bulbs, whereas scallion leaves are hollow and narrow -- about the same width of their bulbs.

For one, their distinct pungent flavor can't be rivaled by anything that is commercially cultivated.

Secondly, they're only available for a very short window in the spring.

Historically ramps were considered a spring tonic in the Appalachians.

Early settlers looked forward to harvesting them after long, hungry winters, as it would have been one of the first vegetables they had eaten in months.

Sustainably harvested ramps.


Ramps: How to Forage & Eat Wild Leeks

Ramps, ramsons or wild leeks, are one of the earliest wild edibles to emerge, and, for some, they're the holy grail of wild edibles.

They're really a type of wild onion with a unique garlicky-onion flavor, which some people find overwhelming. Most folks either love them or despise them.

Some internet sources say they look like scallions, but they look nothing like scallions.

Ramp leaves are flat and much broader than their bulbs, whereas scallion leaves are hollow and narrow -- about the same width of their bulbs.

For one, their distinct pungent flavor can't be rivaled by anything that is commercially cultivated.

Secondly, they're only available for a very short window in the spring.

Historically ramps were considered a spring tonic in the Appalachians.

Early settlers looked forward to harvesting them after long, hungry winters, as it would have been one of the first vegetables they had eaten in months.

Sustainably harvested ramps.


Ramps: How to Forage & Eat Wild Leeks

Ramps, ramsons or wild leeks, are one of the earliest wild edibles to emerge, and, for some, they're the holy grail of wild edibles.

They're really a type of wild onion with a unique garlicky-onion flavor, which some people find overwhelming. Most folks either love them or despise them.

Some internet sources say they look like scallions, but they look nothing like scallions.

Ramp leaves are flat and much broader than their bulbs, whereas scallion leaves are hollow and narrow -- about the same width of their bulbs.

For one, their distinct pungent flavor can't be rivaled by anything that is commercially cultivated.

Secondly, they're only available for a very short window in the spring.

Historically ramps were considered a spring tonic in the Appalachians.

Early settlers looked forward to harvesting them after long, hungry winters, as it would have been one of the first vegetables they had eaten in months.

Sustainably harvested ramps.


Ramps: How to Forage & Eat Wild Leeks

Ramps, ramsons or wild leeks, are one of the earliest wild edibles to emerge, and, for some, they're the holy grail of wild edibles.

They're really a type of wild onion with a unique garlicky-onion flavor, which some people find overwhelming. Most folks either love them or despise them.

Some internet sources say they look like scallions, but they look nothing like scallions.

Ramp leaves are flat and much broader than their bulbs, whereas scallion leaves are hollow and narrow -- about the same width of their bulbs.

For one, their distinct pungent flavor can't be rivaled by anything that is commercially cultivated.

Secondly, they're only available for a very short window in the spring.

Historically ramps were considered a spring tonic in the Appalachians.

Early settlers looked forward to harvesting them after long, hungry winters, as it would have been one of the first vegetables they had eaten in months.

Sustainably harvested ramps.


Ramps: How to Forage & Eat Wild Leeks

Ramps, ramsons or wild leeks, are one of the earliest wild edibles to emerge, and, for some, they're the holy grail of wild edibles.

They're really a type of wild onion with a unique garlicky-onion flavor, which some people find overwhelming. Most folks either love them or despise them.

Some internet sources say they look like scallions, but they look nothing like scallions.

Ramp leaves are flat and much broader than their bulbs, whereas scallion leaves are hollow and narrow -- about the same width of their bulbs.

For one, their distinct pungent flavor can't be rivaled by anything that is commercially cultivated.

Secondly, they're only available for a very short window in the spring.

Historically ramps were considered a spring tonic in the Appalachians.

Early settlers looked forward to harvesting them after long, hungry winters, as it would have been one of the first vegetables they had eaten in months.

Sustainably harvested ramps.


Ramps: How to Forage & Eat Wild Leeks

Ramps, ramsons or wild leeks, are one of the earliest wild edibles to emerge, and, for some, they're the holy grail of wild edibles.

They're really a type of wild onion with a unique garlicky-onion flavor, which some people find overwhelming. Most folks either love them or despise them.

Some internet sources say they look like scallions, but they look nothing like scallions.

Ramp leaves are flat and much broader than their bulbs, whereas scallion leaves are hollow and narrow -- about the same width of their bulbs.

For one, their distinct pungent flavor can't be rivaled by anything that is commercially cultivated.

Secondly, they're only available for a very short window in the spring.

Historically ramps were considered a spring tonic in the Appalachians.

Early settlers looked forward to harvesting them after long, hungry winters, as it would have been one of the first vegetables they had eaten in months.

Sustainably harvested ramps.


Ramps: How to Forage & Eat Wild Leeks

Ramps, ramsons or wild leeks, are one of the earliest wild edibles to emerge, and, for some, they're the holy grail of wild edibles.

They're really a type of wild onion with a unique garlicky-onion flavor, which some people find overwhelming. Most folks either love them or despise them.

Some internet sources say they look like scallions, but they look nothing like scallions.

Ramp leaves are flat and much broader than their bulbs, whereas scallion leaves are hollow and narrow -- about the same width of their bulbs.

For one, their distinct pungent flavor can't be rivaled by anything that is commercially cultivated.

Secondly, they're only available for a very short window in the spring.

Historically ramps were considered a spring tonic in the Appalachians.

Early settlers looked forward to harvesting them after long, hungry winters, as it would have been one of the first vegetables they had eaten in months.

Sustainably harvested ramps.


Ramps: How to Forage & Eat Wild Leeks

Ramps, ramsons or wild leeks, are one of the earliest wild edibles to emerge, and, for some, they're the holy grail of wild edibles.

They're really a type of wild onion with a unique garlicky-onion flavor, which some people find overwhelming. Most folks either love them or despise them.

Some internet sources say they look like scallions, but they look nothing like scallions.

Ramp leaves are flat and much broader than their bulbs, whereas scallion leaves are hollow and narrow -- about the same width of their bulbs.

For one, their distinct pungent flavor can't be rivaled by anything that is commercially cultivated.

Secondly, they're only available for a very short window in the spring.

Historically ramps were considered a spring tonic in the Appalachians.

Early settlers looked forward to harvesting them after long, hungry winters, as it would have been one of the first vegetables they had eaten in months.

Sustainably harvested ramps.


Watch the video: ράμπες (May 2022).