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Florida Man Awarded $37,500 After Police Mistook Krispy Kreme Doughnut Glaze for Meth

Florida Man Awarded $37,500 After Police Mistook Krispy Kreme Doughnut Glaze for Meth


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Daniel Rushing spent 10 hours in jail before being released on bail

KathyDewar / istockphoto.com

A man in Florida has been awarded a $37,500 settlement after being arrested when his Krispy Kreme doughnuts tested false-positive for crystal meth.

NPR reports that in December 2015, Daniel Rushing had just dropped his friend at chemotherapy and was giving an elderly woman a ride home when police allegedly pulled him over for speeding and failing to come to a complete halt at the stop sign. When Officer Shelby Riggs-Hopkins obtained Rushing’s license, she noticed the 64-year-old had a concealed-weapons permit. Rushing confirmed he had a pistol and was asked to step outside the vehicle for the officer’s safety.

Four officers were granted permission to search Rushing’s car, where they found white flakes of a crystal-like substance on the floorboard. When police used a field testing kit on the matter, it tested false-positive for methamphetamine.

Rushing claimed the results were impossible, as he’d never before even smoked a cigarette. Upon reviewing the substance, he informed authorities it was glaze from a Krispy Kreme doughnut, which he gets every other Wednesday. Alas, no one believed him, and he spent 10 hours in jail before being released on bail.

Orlando police sent the evidence away for further testing and found it actually was not a controlled substance. All charges against Rushing were dropped.

“I thought [the lawsuit] was the right thing to do, for what they did to me,” Rushing told NPR.

Now that he’s won the case, Rushing is working on getting his record cleared to pursue a job in security — something difficult to accomplish with an arrest for meth possession on his file.

For more on doughnuts, check out the 15 things you didn’t know about Krispy Kreme.


Man Gets $37K After Cops Mistake Donuts for Meth

A man from Florida was awarded $37,500 after he was arrested by a police officer who mistook 4 flakes of donut glaze on the floorboard of his car for crystal methamphetamine.

Daniel Rushing, 64, filed a lawsuit against the city of Orlando, Florida after he was arrested in December 2015 by a police officer who mistakenly identified flakes of Krispy Kreme donut glaze for meth.

Mr. Rushing told the police officer that he ate Krispy Kreme donuts earlier and the flakes were just sugar glaze. Even so, he was arrested for possession of methamphetamine after the officer’s roadside tests on the flakes were positive for an illegal substance.

Mr. Rushing, a retiree from the Orlando Parks Department, said he had just dropped off a neighbor at the hospital for a chemotherapy session — something he did every Friday — and went to a 7-11 to pick up another elderly church friend to give her a ride home.

The 7-11 was staked out by Cpl. Shelby Riggs-Hopkins, an 8-year department veteran, who was investigating complaints of drug activity.

Mr. Rushing was pulled over because he failed to come to a full stop before pulling out of the 7-11 parking lot. He was handcuffed, arrested, taken to the county jail, strip searched, and locked up for about 10 hours before being released on $2,500 bond.

He told the Orlando Sentinel:

I couldn’t believe it. I’ve never even smoked a cigarette before, let alone meth. I got arrested for no reason at all.”

Mr. Rushing was cleared of the charges after a state drug lab determined that the flakes of donut glaze were not actually methamphetamine. Even so, his arrest derailed his plans to open up a security business.

The police department said the arrest was lawful and did not explain why the glaze tested positive for methamphetamine in both field tests.

The police officer who arrested Mr. Rushing was given a written reprimand, according to the Orlando Police Department, and over 730 officers went through training on how to properly use field-test kits.

Earlier this year, The New York Times reported that its review showed that 21% of the time, drug evidence that was listed by local authorities as methamphetamine turned out to be something else.


Man Gets $37K After Cops Mistake Donuts for Meth

A man from Florida was awarded $37,500 after he was arrested by a police officer who mistook 4 flakes of donut glaze on the floorboard of his car for crystal methamphetamine.

Daniel Rushing, 64, filed a lawsuit against the city of Orlando, Florida after he was arrested in December 2015 by a police officer who mistakenly identified flakes of Krispy Kreme donut glaze for meth.

Mr. Rushing told the police officer that he ate Krispy Kreme donuts earlier and the flakes were just sugar glaze. Even so, he was arrested for possession of methamphetamine after the officer’s roadside tests on the flakes were positive for an illegal substance.

Mr. Rushing, a retiree from the Orlando Parks Department, said he had just dropped off a neighbor at the hospital for a chemotherapy session — something he did every Friday — and went to a 7-11 to pick up another elderly church friend to give her a ride home.

The 7-11 was staked out by Cpl. Shelby Riggs-Hopkins, an 8-year department veteran, who was investigating complaints of drug activity.

Mr. Rushing was pulled over because he failed to come to a full stop before pulling out of the 7-11 parking lot. He was handcuffed, arrested, taken to the county jail, strip searched, and locked up for about 10 hours before being released on $2,500 bond.

He told the Orlando Sentinel:

I couldn’t believe it. I’ve never even smoked a cigarette before, let alone meth. I got arrested for no reason at all.”

Mr. Rushing was cleared of the charges after a state drug lab determined that the flakes of donut glaze were not actually methamphetamine. Even so, his arrest derailed his plans to open up a security business.

The police department said the arrest was lawful and did not explain why the glaze tested positive for methamphetamine in both field tests.

The police officer who arrested Mr. Rushing was given a written reprimand, according to the Orlando Police Department, and over 730 officers went through training on how to properly use field-test kits.

Earlier this year, The New York Times reported that its review showed that 21% of the time, drug evidence that was listed by local authorities as methamphetamine turned out to be something else.


Man Gets $37K After Cops Mistake Donuts for Meth

A man from Florida was awarded $37,500 after he was arrested by a police officer who mistook 4 flakes of donut glaze on the floorboard of his car for crystal methamphetamine.

Daniel Rushing, 64, filed a lawsuit against the city of Orlando, Florida after he was arrested in December 2015 by a police officer who mistakenly identified flakes of Krispy Kreme donut glaze for meth.

Mr. Rushing told the police officer that he ate Krispy Kreme donuts earlier and the flakes were just sugar glaze. Even so, he was arrested for possession of methamphetamine after the officer’s roadside tests on the flakes were positive for an illegal substance.

Mr. Rushing, a retiree from the Orlando Parks Department, said he had just dropped off a neighbor at the hospital for a chemotherapy session — something he did every Friday — and went to a 7-11 to pick up another elderly church friend to give her a ride home.

The 7-11 was staked out by Cpl. Shelby Riggs-Hopkins, an 8-year department veteran, who was investigating complaints of drug activity.

Mr. Rushing was pulled over because he failed to come to a full stop before pulling out of the 7-11 parking lot. He was handcuffed, arrested, taken to the county jail, strip searched, and locked up for about 10 hours before being released on $2,500 bond.

He told the Orlando Sentinel:

I couldn’t believe it. I’ve never even smoked a cigarette before, let alone meth. I got arrested for no reason at all.”

Mr. Rushing was cleared of the charges after a state drug lab determined that the flakes of donut glaze were not actually methamphetamine. Even so, his arrest derailed his plans to open up a security business.

The police department said the arrest was lawful and did not explain why the glaze tested positive for methamphetamine in both field tests.

The police officer who arrested Mr. Rushing was given a written reprimand, according to the Orlando Police Department, and over 730 officers went through training on how to properly use field-test kits.

Earlier this year, The New York Times reported that its review showed that 21% of the time, drug evidence that was listed by local authorities as methamphetamine turned out to be something else.


Man Gets $37K After Cops Mistake Donuts for Meth

A man from Florida was awarded $37,500 after he was arrested by a police officer who mistook 4 flakes of donut glaze on the floorboard of his car for crystal methamphetamine.

Daniel Rushing, 64, filed a lawsuit against the city of Orlando, Florida after he was arrested in December 2015 by a police officer who mistakenly identified flakes of Krispy Kreme donut glaze for meth.

Mr. Rushing told the police officer that he ate Krispy Kreme donuts earlier and the flakes were just sugar glaze. Even so, he was arrested for possession of methamphetamine after the officer’s roadside tests on the flakes were positive for an illegal substance.

Mr. Rushing, a retiree from the Orlando Parks Department, said he had just dropped off a neighbor at the hospital for a chemotherapy session — something he did every Friday — and went to a 7-11 to pick up another elderly church friend to give her a ride home.

The 7-11 was staked out by Cpl. Shelby Riggs-Hopkins, an 8-year department veteran, who was investigating complaints of drug activity.

Mr. Rushing was pulled over because he failed to come to a full stop before pulling out of the 7-11 parking lot. He was handcuffed, arrested, taken to the county jail, strip searched, and locked up for about 10 hours before being released on $2,500 bond.

He told the Orlando Sentinel:

I couldn’t believe it. I’ve never even smoked a cigarette before, let alone meth. I got arrested for no reason at all.”

Mr. Rushing was cleared of the charges after a state drug lab determined that the flakes of donut glaze were not actually methamphetamine. Even so, his arrest derailed his plans to open up a security business.

The police department said the arrest was lawful and did not explain why the glaze tested positive for methamphetamine in both field tests.

The police officer who arrested Mr. Rushing was given a written reprimand, according to the Orlando Police Department, and over 730 officers went through training on how to properly use field-test kits.

Earlier this year, The New York Times reported that its review showed that 21% of the time, drug evidence that was listed by local authorities as methamphetamine turned out to be something else.


Man Gets $37K After Cops Mistake Donuts for Meth

A man from Florida was awarded $37,500 after he was arrested by a police officer who mistook 4 flakes of donut glaze on the floorboard of his car for crystal methamphetamine.

Daniel Rushing, 64, filed a lawsuit against the city of Orlando, Florida after he was arrested in December 2015 by a police officer who mistakenly identified flakes of Krispy Kreme donut glaze for meth.

Mr. Rushing told the police officer that he ate Krispy Kreme donuts earlier and the flakes were just sugar glaze. Even so, he was arrested for possession of methamphetamine after the officer’s roadside tests on the flakes were positive for an illegal substance.

Mr. Rushing, a retiree from the Orlando Parks Department, said he had just dropped off a neighbor at the hospital for a chemotherapy session — something he did every Friday — and went to a 7-11 to pick up another elderly church friend to give her a ride home.

The 7-11 was staked out by Cpl. Shelby Riggs-Hopkins, an 8-year department veteran, who was investigating complaints of drug activity.

Mr. Rushing was pulled over because he failed to come to a full stop before pulling out of the 7-11 parking lot. He was handcuffed, arrested, taken to the county jail, strip searched, and locked up for about 10 hours before being released on $2,500 bond.

He told the Orlando Sentinel:

I couldn’t believe it. I’ve never even smoked a cigarette before, let alone meth. I got arrested for no reason at all.”

Mr. Rushing was cleared of the charges after a state drug lab determined that the flakes of donut glaze were not actually methamphetamine. Even so, his arrest derailed his plans to open up a security business.

The police department said the arrest was lawful and did not explain why the glaze tested positive for methamphetamine in both field tests.

The police officer who arrested Mr. Rushing was given a written reprimand, according to the Orlando Police Department, and over 730 officers went through training on how to properly use field-test kits.

Earlier this year, The New York Times reported that its review showed that 21% of the time, drug evidence that was listed by local authorities as methamphetamine turned out to be something else.


Man Gets $37K After Cops Mistake Donuts for Meth

A man from Florida was awarded $37,500 after he was arrested by a police officer who mistook 4 flakes of donut glaze on the floorboard of his car for crystal methamphetamine.

Daniel Rushing, 64, filed a lawsuit against the city of Orlando, Florida after he was arrested in December 2015 by a police officer who mistakenly identified flakes of Krispy Kreme donut glaze for meth.

Mr. Rushing told the police officer that he ate Krispy Kreme donuts earlier and the flakes were just sugar glaze. Even so, he was arrested for possession of methamphetamine after the officer’s roadside tests on the flakes were positive for an illegal substance.

Mr. Rushing, a retiree from the Orlando Parks Department, said he had just dropped off a neighbor at the hospital for a chemotherapy session — something he did every Friday — and went to a 7-11 to pick up another elderly church friend to give her a ride home.

The 7-11 was staked out by Cpl. Shelby Riggs-Hopkins, an 8-year department veteran, who was investigating complaints of drug activity.

Mr. Rushing was pulled over because he failed to come to a full stop before pulling out of the 7-11 parking lot. He was handcuffed, arrested, taken to the county jail, strip searched, and locked up for about 10 hours before being released on $2,500 bond.

He told the Orlando Sentinel:

I couldn’t believe it. I’ve never even smoked a cigarette before, let alone meth. I got arrested for no reason at all.”

Mr. Rushing was cleared of the charges after a state drug lab determined that the flakes of donut glaze were not actually methamphetamine. Even so, his arrest derailed his plans to open up a security business.

The police department said the arrest was lawful and did not explain why the glaze tested positive for methamphetamine in both field tests.

The police officer who arrested Mr. Rushing was given a written reprimand, according to the Orlando Police Department, and over 730 officers went through training on how to properly use field-test kits.

Earlier this year, The New York Times reported that its review showed that 21% of the time, drug evidence that was listed by local authorities as methamphetamine turned out to be something else.


Man Gets $37K After Cops Mistake Donuts for Meth

A man from Florida was awarded $37,500 after he was arrested by a police officer who mistook 4 flakes of donut glaze on the floorboard of his car for crystal methamphetamine.

Daniel Rushing, 64, filed a lawsuit against the city of Orlando, Florida after he was arrested in December 2015 by a police officer who mistakenly identified flakes of Krispy Kreme donut glaze for meth.

Mr. Rushing told the police officer that he ate Krispy Kreme donuts earlier and the flakes were just sugar glaze. Even so, he was arrested for possession of methamphetamine after the officer’s roadside tests on the flakes were positive for an illegal substance.

Mr. Rushing, a retiree from the Orlando Parks Department, said he had just dropped off a neighbor at the hospital for a chemotherapy session — something he did every Friday — and went to a 7-11 to pick up another elderly church friend to give her a ride home.

The 7-11 was staked out by Cpl. Shelby Riggs-Hopkins, an 8-year department veteran, who was investigating complaints of drug activity.

Mr. Rushing was pulled over because he failed to come to a full stop before pulling out of the 7-11 parking lot. He was handcuffed, arrested, taken to the county jail, strip searched, and locked up for about 10 hours before being released on $2,500 bond.

He told the Orlando Sentinel:

I couldn’t believe it. I’ve never even smoked a cigarette before, let alone meth. I got arrested for no reason at all.”

Mr. Rushing was cleared of the charges after a state drug lab determined that the flakes of donut glaze were not actually methamphetamine. Even so, his arrest derailed his plans to open up a security business.

The police department said the arrest was lawful and did not explain why the glaze tested positive for methamphetamine in both field tests.

The police officer who arrested Mr. Rushing was given a written reprimand, according to the Orlando Police Department, and over 730 officers went through training on how to properly use field-test kits.

Earlier this year, The New York Times reported that its review showed that 21% of the time, drug evidence that was listed by local authorities as methamphetamine turned out to be something else.


Man Gets $37K After Cops Mistake Donuts for Meth

A man from Florida was awarded $37,500 after he was arrested by a police officer who mistook 4 flakes of donut glaze on the floorboard of his car for crystal methamphetamine.

Daniel Rushing, 64, filed a lawsuit against the city of Orlando, Florida after he was arrested in December 2015 by a police officer who mistakenly identified flakes of Krispy Kreme donut glaze for meth.

Mr. Rushing told the police officer that he ate Krispy Kreme donuts earlier and the flakes were just sugar glaze. Even so, he was arrested for possession of methamphetamine after the officer’s roadside tests on the flakes were positive for an illegal substance.

Mr. Rushing, a retiree from the Orlando Parks Department, said he had just dropped off a neighbor at the hospital for a chemotherapy session — something he did every Friday — and went to a 7-11 to pick up another elderly church friend to give her a ride home.

The 7-11 was staked out by Cpl. Shelby Riggs-Hopkins, an 8-year department veteran, who was investigating complaints of drug activity.

Mr. Rushing was pulled over because he failed to come to a full stop before pulling out of the 7-11 parking lot. He was handcuffed, arrested, taken to the county jail, strip searched, and locked up for about 10 hours before being released on $2,500 bond.

He told the Orlando Sentinel:

I couldn’t believe it. I’ve never even smoked a cigarette before, let alone meth. I got arrested for no reason at all.”

Mr. Rushing was cleared of the charges after a state drug lab determined that the flakes of donut glaze were not actually methamphetamine. Even so, his arrest derailed his plans to open up a security business.

The police department said the arrest was lawful and did not explain why the glaze tested positive for methamphetamine in both field tests.

The police officer who arrested Mr. Rushing was given a written reprimand, according to the Orlando Police Department, and over 730 officers went through training on how to properly use field-test kits.

Earlier this year, The New York Times reported that its review showed that 21% of the time, drug evidence that was listed by local authorities as methamphetamine turned out to be something else.


Man Gets $37K After Cops Mistake Donuts for Meth

A man from Florida was awarded $37,500 after he was arrested by a police officer who mistook 4 flakes of donut glaze on the floorboard of his car for crystal methamphetamine.

Daniel Rushing, 64, filed a lawsuit against the city of Orlando, Florida after he was arrested in December 2015 by a police officer who mistakenly identified flakes of Krispy Kreme donut glaze for meth.

Mr. Rushing told the police officer that he ate Krispy Kreme donuts earlier and the flakes were just sugar glaze. Even so, he was arrested for possession of methamphetamine after the officer’s roadside tests on the flakes were positive for an illegal substance.

Mr. Rushing, a retiree from the Orlando Parks Department, said he had just dropped off a neighbor at the hospital for a chemotherapy session — something he did every Friday — and went to a 7-11 to pick up another elderly church friend to give her a ride home.

The 7-11 was staked out by Cpl. Shelby Riggs-Hopkins, an 8-year department veteran, who was investigating complaints of drug activity.

Mr. Rushing was pulled over because he failed to come to a full stop before pulling out of the 7-11 parking lot. He was handcuffed, arrested, taken to the county jail, strip searched, and locked up for about 10 hours before being released on $2,500 bond.

He told the Orlando Sentinel:

I couldn’t believe it. I’ve never even smoked a cigarette before, let alone meth. I got arrested for no reason at all.”

Mr. Rushing was cleared of the charges after a state drug lab determined that the flakes of donut glaze were not actually methamphetamine. Even so, his arrest derailed his plans to open up a security business.

The police department said the arrest was lawful and did not explain why the glaze tested positive for methamphetamine in both field tests.

The police officer who arrested Mr. Rushing was given a written reprimand, according to the Orlando Police Department, and over 730 officers went through training on how to properly use field-test kits.

Earlier this year, The New York Times reported that its review showed that 21% of the time, drug evidence that was listed by local authorities as methamphetamine turned out to be something else.


Man Gets $37K After Cops Mistake Donuts for Meth

A man from Florida was awarded $37,500 after he was arrested by a police officer who mistook 4 flakes of donut glaze on the floorboard of his car for crystal methamphetamine.

Daniel Rushing, 64, filed a lawsuit against the city of Orlando, Florida after he was arrested in December 2015 by a police officer who mistakenly identified flakes of Krispy Kreme donut glaze for meth.

Mr. Rushing told the police officer that he ate Krispy Kreme donuts earlier and the flakes were just sugar glaze. Even so, he was arrested for possession of methamphetamine after the officer’s roadside tests on the flakes were positive for an illegal substance.

Mr. Rushing, a retiree from the Orlando Parks Department, said he had just dropped off a neighbor at the hospital for a chemotherapy session — something he did every Friday — and went to a 7-11 to pick up another elderly church friend to give her a ride home.

The 7-11 was staked out by Cpl. Shelby Riggs-Hopkins, an 8-year department veteran, who was investigating complaints of drug activity.

Mr. Rushing was pulled over because he failed to come to a full stop before pulling out of the 7-11 parking lot. He was handcuffed, arrested, taken to the county jail, strip searched, and locked up for about 10 hours before being released on $2,500 bond.

He told the Orlando Sentinel:

I couldn’t believe it. I’ve never even smoked a cigarette before, let alone meth. I got arrested for no reason at all.”

Mr. Rushing was cleared of the charges after a state drug lab determined that the flakes of donut glaze were not actually methamphetamine. Even so, his arrest derailed his plans to open up a security business.

The police department said the arrest was lawful and did not explain why the glaze tested positive for methamphetamine in both field tests.

The police officer who arrested Mr. Rushing was given a written reprimand, according to the Orlando Police Department, and over 730 officers went through training on how to properly use field-test kits.

Earlier this year, The New York Times reported that its review showed that 21% of the time, drug evidence that was listed by local authorities as methamphetamine turned out to be something else.


Watch the video: Police Arrest Florida Man Over a Donut. WTFLORIDA (May 2022).