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Doughnut Plant and Chase Feature ‘Inception-style’ Doughnut in ‘The Ripple Effect’ Campaign

Doughnut Plant and Chase Feature ‘Inception-style’ Doughnut in ‘The Ripple Effect’ Campaign


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Isreal was able to create The Ripple using points from his Chase Ink business preferred card

Isreal used his bike as inspiration to create The Ripple.

In 2016, New York-based Doughnut Plant introduced The Ripple — an Instagram-worthy, three-layer “Inception-style” doughnut, according to Grub Street. This year, a new campaign from Chase for Business features the creator of the doughnut and founder of the store, Mark Isreal, detailing his journey toward bringing The Ripple to life.

Ad agency Droga5 conceived the campaign, which aims to show how small business owners can take advantage of Chase’s point system to make their dreams a reality as Isreal did, Adweek reported.

“I wasn’t interested in doing something that had been done before,” Isreal says in the ad. “I wanted to make this new kind of doughnut, but creating something new is expensive.”

By using his Chase card for purchases, Isreal gained around 80,000 points to fund all the materials needed to create The Ripple, including flour, sugar, butter, and milk.

Isreal also used his points to purchase all the equipment to design the tools used to create The Ripple.


Episode 56 - Ethical Coffee

Coffee beans are the inner seed from the “cherry” of the coffea plant, which is native to Ethiopia.[1] Coffee is the world’s second most tradable commodity, after crude oil. There are four primary types of coffee: Arabica (coffea arabica), Robusta (coffea caniphora), Liberica (coffea liberica), and Exelsa (coffea liberica var. dewervrei).

Arabica is the most common type of coffee consumed in North America. Arabica beans are sweet less acidic in flavour than Robusta beans. They are farmed in areas with high elevations above sea level and where rain is prevalent. Arabica plants are delicate and prone to disease, which makes it challenging to grow in large quantities.

Robusta beans are most popular in Europe, the Middle East, and Africa. It is not generally very popular because it can taste burnt or rubbery. But Robusta coffee is easier to grow and has higher levels of caffeine (which acts as a natural insect repellant). It is typically used in instant coffee and as a filler in dark roasts. There are some very good Robusta coffees, but this variety is usually seen as lower quality.

Liberica and Excelsa are both relatively rare coffee beans.

You can grow a coffee plant in your apartment, but don’t expect it to produce coffee cherries. Coffee plants are trees that yield mature harvests only after 4-7 years of attentive cultivation.[2]

There are lots of different coffee brewing styles (e.g., drip, pour over, cold brew, espresso, ristretto). Capsule coffee is a rising trend. More than 40% of U.S. households own an espresso pod machine. The global market for coffee pod and capsule machines is expected to double by 2025.

There is also a wide variety of coffee drink types (e.g., espresso, americano, cappuccino, flat white, affogato, iced coffee) but we won’t get into those.

How Coffee is Made

When coffee cherries are picked, the beans are removed either through a “dry” or “wet” process. The dry process involves leaving the beans in the sun to dry and then running them through a grinder. In the wet process, you use water to wash the fruit away from the seed. The “green” coffee beans are then “cleaned” (inspected and sorted) and then roasted.

A (Brief) History of Coffee

Four hundred years ago, coffee was a “mysterious Ottoman custom” cultivated commercially only in Yemen.[3] Now it is an “unrivalled work drug” and a ubiquitous daily necessity.[4] It is also a cash crop produced by more than 25 million people in over 70 countries.[5]

The word coffee derives from the Arabic “qahwah”, meaning wine: coffee is the wine of Islam.[6] Early coffee cultivation took place in the sixteenth century on the hillsides of Yemen.[7] The Ottoman empire set up a coffeehouse as one of its first actions after conquering a new city, to demonstrate the civility of their rule.[8]

Coffee became a European luxury in the seventeenth century as Europeans brought the tradition back from visits in the Middle East. Coffee was especially popular in England. The first coffeehouse in London was established in the early 1650s, but by the turn of the 18th century there were several hundred coffeehouses there.[9]

British traders had more success trading for tea than coffee, which is one reason that England is today associated more with tea than coffee.[10]

Arab traders in Yemen monopolized coffee production until 1699, when the Dutch successfully introduced coffee to Java.[11]After that, coffee spread around the world through pathways of empire and slavery.[12] After the Dutch, the French colonial administrators took coffee to Africa. Then the Dutch introduced coffee to Suriname. Then a Portuguese official smuggled coffee from French Guiana to Brazil. The British began cultivating coffee in Jamaica and the Spanish established coffee in Cuba. By the end of the 18th century coffee was virtually everywhere in the Americas.[13]

The Coffee Industry

The total value of the global coffee industry was $465.9 billion in 2020 (this was a huge jump from 2019). 10.21 million bags of coffee were exported in 2020.

People around the world drink coffee, but the Aussies may be the most committed market. Even though the U.S. population is 12x the Australian population, the Australian coffee market ($7.8 billion) is more than half as much as the U.S. coffee market ($14 billion).

The world’s top coffee exporters include: Brazil, Vietnam, Colombia, Honduras, and Indonesia. Canada’s top coffee supplying countries are Brazil, Peru, Colombia, Nicaragua, Guatemala, and Mexico.

Around 125 million people globally depend on coffee for their livelihoods. Unlike some commodities, which are grown on large plantations, small coffee farms proliferate: smallholder farmers produce 80% of the world’s coffee.

Like other agricultural commodities, farmworkers receive very little of the value added from coffee. Coffee farmers typically earn only 7-10% of the retail price of coffee. The rest goes to traders, roasters, and retailers downstream.

In part, this has to do with the concentration of coffee buying and processing. Three coffee buyers control half of the global coffee trade (ECOM, Neumann and Volcafe). And 40% of coffee is processed by the ten largest coffee roasters, including Nestlé and Jacobs Douwe Egbers (JDE).

There is an interest in making the coffee industry fairer. Consumer research has found that 53% of U.S. coffee drinkers want to buy ethical coffee and are willing to pay $1.31 extra for a cup of coffee produced by a cooperative farmer.


Episode 56 - Ethical Coffee

Coffee beans are the inner seed from the “cherry” of the coffea plant, which is native to Ethiopia.[1] Coffee is the world’s second most tradable commodity, after crude oil. There are four primary types of coffee: Arabica (coffea arabica), Robusta (coffea caniphora), Liberica (coffea liberica), and Exelsa (coffea liberica var. dewervrei).

Arabica is the most common type of coffee consumed in North America. Arabica beans are sweet less acidic in flavour than Robusta beans. They are farmed in areas with high elevations above sea level and where rain is prevalent. Arabica plants are delicate and prone to disease, which makes it challenging to grow in large quantities.

Robusta beans are most popular in Europe, the Middle East, and Africa. It is not generally very popular because it can taste burnt or rubbery. But Robusta coffee is easier to grow and has higher levels of caffeine (which acts as a natural insect repellant). It is typically used in instant coffee and as a filler in dark roasts. There are some very good Robusta coffees, but this variety is usually seen as lower quality.

Liberica and Excelsa are both relatively rare coffee beans.

You can grow a coffee plant in your apartment, but don’t expect it to produce coffee cherries. Coffee plants are trees that yield mature harvests only after 4-7 years of attentive cultivation.[2]

There are lots of different coffee brewing styles (e.g., drip, pour over, cold brew, espresso, ristretto). Capsule coffee is a rising trend. More than 40% of U.S. households own an espresso pod machine. The global market for coffee pod and capsule machines is expected to double by 2025.

There is also a wide variety of coffee drink types (e.g., espresso, americano, cappuccino, flat white, affogato, iced coffee) but we won’t get into those.

How Coffee is Made

When coffee cherries are picked, the beans are removed either through a “dry” or “wet” process. The dry process involves leaving the beans in the sun to dry and then running them through a grinder. In the wet process, you use water to wash the fruit away from the seed. The “green” coffee beans are then “cleaned” (inspected and sorted) and then roasted.

A (Brief) History of Coffee

Four hundred years ago, coffee was a “mysterious Ottoman custom” cultivated commercially only in Yemen.[3] Now it is an “unrivalled work drug” and a ubiquitous daily necessity.[4] It is also a cash crop produced by more than 25 million people in over 70 countries.[5]

The word coffee derives from the Arabic “qahwah”, meaning wine: coffee is the wine of Islam.[6] Early coffee cultivation took place in the sixteenth century on the hillsides of Yemen.[7] The Ottoman empire set up a coffeehouse as one of its first actions after conquering a new city, to demonstrate the civility of their rule.[8]

Coffee became a European luxury in the seventeenth century as Europeans brought the tradition back from visits in the Middle East. Coffee was especially popular in England. The first coffeehouse in London was established in the early 1650s, but by the turn of the 18th century there were several hundred coffeehouses there.[9]

British traders had more success trading for tea than coffee, which is one reason that England is today associated more with tea than coffee.[10]

Arab traders in Yemen monopolized coffee production until 1699, when the Dutch successfully introduced coffee to Java.[11]After that, coffee spread around the world through pathways of empire and slavery.[12] After the Dutch, the French colonial administrators took coffee to Africa. Then the Dutch introduced coffee to Suriname. Then a Portuguese official smuggled coffee from French Guiana to Brazil. The British began cultivating coffee in Jamaica and the Spanish established coffee in Cuba. By the end of the 18th century coffee was virtually everywhere in the Americas.[13]

The Coffee Industry

The total value of the global coffee industry was $465.9 billion in 2020 (this was a huge jump from 2019). 10.21 million bags of coffee were exported in 2020.

People around the world drink coffee, but the Aussies may be the most committed market. Even though the U.S. population is 12x the Australian population, the Australian coffee market ($7.8 billion) is more than half as much as the U.S. coffee market ($14 billion).

The world’s top coffee exporters include: Brazil, Vietnam, Colombia, Honduras, and Indonesia. Canada’s top coffee supplying countries are Brazil, Peru, Colombia, Nicaragua, Guatemala, and Mexico.

Around 125 million people globally depend on coffee for their livelihoods. Unlike some commodities, which are grown on large plantations, small coffee farms proliferate: smallholder farmers produce 80% of the world’s coffee.

Like other agricultural commodities, farmworkers receive very little of the value added from coffee. Coffee farmers typically earn only 7-10% of the retail price of coffee. The rest goes to traders, roasters, and retailers downstream.

In part, this has to do with the concentration of coffee buying and processing. Three coffee buyers control half of the global coffee trade (ECOM, Neumann and Volcafe). And 40% of coffee is processed by the ten largest coffee roasters, including Nestlé and Jacobs Douwe Egbers (JDE).

There is an interest in making the coffee industry fairer. Consumer research has found that 53% of U.S. coffee drinkers want to buy ethical coffee and are willing to pay $1.31 extra for a cup of coffee produced by a cooperative farmer.


Episode 56 - Ethical Coffee

Coffee beans are the inner seed from the “cherry” of the coffea plant, which is native to Ethiopia.[1] Coffee is the world’s second most tradable commodity, after crude oil. There are four primary types of coffee: Arabica (coffea arabica), Robusta (coffea caniphora), Liberica (coffea liberica), and Exelsa (coffea liberica var. dewervrei).

Arabica is the most common type of coffee consumed in North America. Arabica beans are sweet less acidic in flavour than Robusta beans. They are farmed in areas with high elevations above sea level and where rain is prevalent. Arabica plants are delicate and prone to disease, which makes it challenging to grow in large quantities.

Robusta beans are most popular in Europe, the Middle East, and Africa. It is not generally very popular because it can taste burnt or rubbery. But Robusta coffee is easier to grow and has higher levels of caffeine (which acts as a natural insect repellant). It is typically used in instant coffee and as a filler in dark roasts. There are some very good Robusta coffees, but this variety is usually seen as lower quality.

Liberica and Excelsa are both relatively rare coffee beans.

You can grow a coffee plant in your apartment, but don’t expect it to produce coffee cherries. Coffee plants are trees that yield mature harvests only after 4-7 years of attentive cultivation.[2]

There are lots of different coffee brewing styles (e.g., drip, pour over, cold brew, espresso, ristretto). Capsule coffee is a rising trend. More than 40% of U.S. households own an espresso pod machine. The global market for coffee pod and capsule machines is expected to double by 2025.

There is also a wide variety of coffee drink types (e.g., espresso, americano, cappuccino, flat white, affogato, iced coffee) but we won’t get into those.

How Coffee is Made

When coffee cherries are picked, the beans are removed either through a “dry” or “wet” process. The dry process involves leaving the beans in the sun to dry and then running them through a grinder. In the wet process, you use water to wash the fruit away from the seed. The “green” coffee beans are then “cleaned” (inspected and sorted) and then roasted.

A (Brief) History of Coffee

Four hundred years ago, coffee was a “mysterious Ottoman custom” cultivated commercially only in Yemen.[3] Now it is an “unrivalled work drug” and a ubiquitous daily necessity.[4] It is also a cash crop produced by more than 25 million people in over 70 countries.[5]

The word coffee derives from the Arabic “qahwah”, meaning wine: coffee is the wine of Islam.[6] Early coffee cultivation took place in the sixteenth century on the hillsides of Yemen.[7] The Ottoman empire set up a coffeehouse as one of its first actions after conquering a new city, to demonstrate the civility of their rule.[8]

Coffee became a European luxury in the seventeenth century as Europeans brought the tradition back from visits in the Middle East. Coffee was especially popular in England. The first coffeehouse in London was established in the early 1650s, but by the turn of the 18th century there were several hundred coffeehouses there.[9]

British traders had more success trading for tea than coffee, which is one reason that England is today associated more with tea than coffee.[10]

Arab traders in Yemen monopolized coffee production until 1699, when the Dutch successfully introduced coffee to Java.[11]After that, coffee spread around the world through pathways of empire and slavery.[12] After the Dutch, the French colonial administrators took coffee to Africa. Then the Dutch introduced coffee to Suriname. Then a Portuguese official smuggled coffee from French Guiana to Brazil. The British began cultivating coffee in Jamaica and the Spanish established coffee in Cuba. By the end of the 18th century coffee was virtually everywhere in the Americas.[13]

The Coffee Industry

The total value of the global coffee industry was $465.9 billion in 2020 (this was a huge jump from 2019). 10.21 million bags of coffee were exported in 2020.

People around the world drink coffee, but the Aussies may be the most committed market. Even though the U.S. population is 12x the Australian population, the Australian coffee market ($7.8 billion) is more than half as much as the U.S. coffee market ($14 billion).

The world’s top coffee exporters include: Brazil, Vietnam, Colombia, Honduras, and Indonesia. Canada’s top coffee supplying countries are Brazil, Peru, Colombia, Nicaragua, Guatemala, and Mexico.

Around 125 million people globally depend on coffee for their livelihoods. Unlike some commodities, which are grown on large plantations, small coffee farms proliferate: smallholder farmers produce 80% of the world’s coffee.

Like other agricultural commodities, farmworkers receive very little of the value added from coffee. Coffee farmers typically earn only 7-10% of the retail price of coffee. The rest goes to traders, roasters, and retailers downstream.

In part, this has to do with the concentration of coffee buying and processing. Three coffee buyers control half of the global coffee trade (ECOM, Neumann and Volcafe). And 40% of coffee is processed by the ten largest coffee roasters, including Nestlé and Jacobs Douwe Egbers (JDE).

There is an interest in making the coffee industry fairer. Consumer research has found that 53% of U.S. coffee drinkers want to buy ethical coffee and are willing to pay $1.31 extra for a cup of coffee produced by a cooperative farmer.


Episode 56 - Ethical Coffee

Coffee beans are the inner seed from the “cherry” of the coffea plant, which is native to Ethiopia.[1] Coffee is the world’s second most tradable commodity, after crude oil. There are four primary types of coffee: Arabica (coffea arabica), Robusta (coffea caniphora), Liberica (coffea liberica), and Exelsa (coffea liberica var. dewervrei).

Arabica is the most common type of coffee consumed in North America. Arabica beans are sweet less acidic in flavour than Robusta beans. They are farmed in areas with high elevations above sea level and where rain is prevalent. Arabica plants are delicate and prone to disease, which makes it challenging to grow in large quantities.

Robusta beans are most popular in Europe, the Middle East, and Africa. It is not generally very popular because it can taste burnt or rubbery. But Robusta coffee is easier to grow and has higher levels of caffeine (which acts as a natural insect repellant). It is typically used in instant coffee and as a filler in dark roasts. There are some very good Robusta coffees, but this variety is usually seen as lower quality.

Liberica and Excelsa are both relatively rare coffee beans.

You can grow a coffee plant in your apartment, but don’t expect it to produce coffee cherries. Coffee plants are trees that yield mature harvests only after 4-7 years of attentive cultivation.[2]

There are lots of different coffee brewing styles (e.g., drip, pour over, cold brew, espresso, ristretto). Capsule coffee is a rising trend. More than 40% of U.S. households own an espresso pod machine. The global market for coffee pod and capsule machines is expected to double by 2025.

There is also a wide variety of coffee drink types (e.g., espresso, americano, cappuccino, flat white, affogato, iced coffee) but we won’t get into those.

How Coffee is Made

When coffee cherries are picked, the beans are removed either through a “dry” or “wet” process. The dry process involves leaving the beans in the sun to dry and then running them through a grinder. In the wet process, you use water to wash the fruit away from the seed. The “green” coffee beans are then “cleaned” (inspected and sorted) and then roasted.

A (Brief) History of Coffee

Four hundred years ago, coffee was a “mysterious Ottoman custom” cultivated commercially only in Yemen.[3] Now it is an “unrivalled work drug” and a ubiquitous daily necessity.[4] It is also a cash crop produced by more than 25 million people in over 70 countries.[5]

The word coffee derives from the Arabic “qahwah”, meaning wine: coffee is the wine of Islam.[6] Early coffee cultivation took place in the sixteenth century on the hillsides of Yemen.[7] The Ottoman empire set up a coffeehouse as one of its first actions after conquering a new city, to demonstrate the civility of their rule.[8]

Coffee became a European luxury in the seventeenth century as Europeans brought the tradition back from visits in the Middle East. Coffee was especially popular in England. The first coffeehouse in London was established in the early 1650s, but by the turn of the 18th century there were several hundred coffeehouses there.[9]

British traders had more success trading for tea than coffee, which is one reason that England is today associated more with tea than coffee.[10]

Arab traders in Yemen monopolized coffee production until 1699, when the Dutch successfully introduced coffee to Java.[11]After that, coffee spread around the world through pathways of empire and slavery.[12] After the Dutch, the French colonial administrators took coffee to Africa. Then the Dutch introduced coffee to Suriname. Then a Portuguese official smuggled coffee from French Guiana to Brazil. The British began cultivating coffee in Jamaica and the Spanish established coffee in Cuba. By the end of the 18th century coffee was virtually everywhere in the Americas.[13]

The Coffee Industry

The total value of the global coffee industry was $465.9 billion in 2020 (this was a huge jump from 2019). 10.21 million bags of coffee were exported in 2020.

People around the world drink coffee, but the Aussies may be the most committed market. Even though the U.S. population is 12x the Australian population, the Australian coffee market ($7.8 billion) is more than half as much as the U.S. coffee market ($14 billion).

The world’s top coffee exporters include: Brazil, Vietnam, Colombia, Honduras, and Indonesia. Canada’s top coffee supplying countries are Brazil, Peru, Colombia, Nicaragua, Guatemala, and Mexico.

Around 125 million people globally depend on coffee for their livelihoods. Unlike some commodities, which are grown on large plantations, small coffee farms proliferate: smallholder farmers produce 80% of the world’s coffee.

Like other agricultural commodities, farmworkers receive very little of the value added from coffee. Coffee farmers typically earn only 7-10% of the retail price of coffee. The rest goes to traders, roasters, and retailers downstream.

In part, this has to do with the concentration of coffee buying and processing. Three coffee buyers control half of the global coffee trade (ECOM, Neumann and Volcafe). And 40% of coffee is processed by the ten largest coffee roasters, including Nestlé and Jacobs Douwe Egbers (JDE).

There is an interest in making the coffee industry fairer. Consumer research has found that 53% of U.S. coffee drinkers want to buy ethical coffee and are willing to pay $1.31 extra for a cup of coffee produced by a cooperative farmer.


Episode 56 - Ethical Coffee

Coffee beans are the inner seed from the “cherry” of the coffea plant, which is native to Ethiopia.[1] Coffee is the world’s second most tradable commodity, after crude oil. There are four primary types of coffee: Arabica (coffea arabica), Robusta (coffea caniphora), Liberica (coffea liberica), and Exelsa (coffea liberica var. dewervrei).

Arabica is the most common type of coffee consumed in North America. Arabica beans are sweet less acidic in flavour than Robusta beans. They are farmed in areas with high elevations above sea level and where rain is prevalent. Arabica plants are delicate and prone to disease, which makes it challenging to grow in large quantities.

Robusta beans are most popular in Europe, the Middle East, and Africa. It is not generally very popular because it can taste burnt or rubbery. But Robusta coffee is easier to grow and has higher levels of caffeine (which acts as a natural insect repellant). It is typically used in instant coffee and as a filler in dark roasts. There are some very good Robusta coffees, but this variety is usually seen as lower quality.

Liberica and Excelsa are both relatively rare coffee beans.

You can grow a coffee plant in your apartment, but don’t expect it to produce coffee cherries. Coffee plants are trees that yield mature harvests only after 4-7 years of attentive cultivation.[2]

There are lots of different coffee brewing styles (e.g., drip, pour over, cold brew, espresso, ristretto). Capsule coffee is a rising trend. More than 40% of U.S. households own an espresso pod machine. The global market for coffee pod and capsule machines is expected to double by 2025.

There is also a wide variety of coffee drink types (e.g., espresso, americano, cappuccino, flat white, affogato, iced coffee) but we won’t get into those.

How Coffee is Made

When coffee cherries are picked, the beans are removed either through a “dry” or “wet” process. The dry process involves leaving the beans in the sun to dry and then running them through a grinder. In the wet process, you use water to wash the fruit away from the seed. The “green” coffee beans are then “cleaned” (inspected and sorted) and then roasted.

A (Brief) History of Coffee

Four hundred years ago, coffee was a “mysterious Ottoman custom” cultivated commercially only in Yemen.[3] Now it is an “unrivalled work drug” and a ubiquitous daily necessity.[4] It is also a cash crop produced by more than 25 million people in over 70 countries.[5]

The word coffee derives from the Arabic “qahwah”, meaning wine: coffee is the wine of Islam.[6] Early coffee cultivation took place in the sixteenth century on the hillsides of Yemen.[7] The Ottoman empire set up a coffeehouse as one of its first actions after conquering a new city, to demonstrate the civility of their rule.[8]

Coffee became a European luxury in the seventeenth century as Europeans brought the tradition back from visits in the Middle East. Coffee was especially popular in England. The first coffeehouse in London was established in the early 1650s, but by the turn of the 18th century there were several hundred coffeehouses there.[9]

British traders had more success trading for tea than coffee, which is one reason that England is today associated more with tea than coffee.[10]

Arab traders in Yemen monopolized coffee production until 1699, when the Dutch successfully introduced coffee to Java.[11]After that, coffee spread around the world through pathways of empire and slavery.[12] After the Dutch, the French colonial administrators took coffee to Africa. Then the Dutch introduced coffee to Suriname. Then a Portuguese official smuggled coffee from French Guiana to Brazil. The British began cultivating coffee in Jamaica and the Spanish established coffee in Cuba. By the end of the 18th century coffee was virtually everywhere in the Americas.[13]

The Coffee Industry

The total value of the global coffee industry was $465.9 billion in 2020 (this was a huge jump from 2019). 10.21 million bags of coffee were exported in 2020.

People around the world drink coffee, but the Aussies may be the most committed market. Even though the U.S. population is 12x the Australian population, the Australian coffee market ($7.8 billion) is more than half as much as the U.S. coffee market ($14 billion).

The world’s top coffee exporters include: Brazil, Vietnam, Colombia, Honduras, and Indonesia. Canada’s top coffee supplying countries are Brazil, Peru, Colombia, Nicaragua, Guatemala, and Mexico.

Around 125 million people globally depend on coffee for their livelihoods. Unlike some commodities, which are grown on large plantations, small coffee farms proliferate: smallholder farmers produce 80% of the world’s coffee.

Like other agricultural commodities, farmworkers receive very little of the value added from coffee. Coffee farmers typically earn only 7-10% of the retail price of coffee. The rest goes to traders, roasters, and retailers downstream.

In part, this has to do with the concentration of coffee buying and processing. Three coffee buyers control half of the global coffee trade (ECOM, Neumann and Volcafe). And 40% of coffee is processed by the ten largest coffee roasters, including Nestlé and Jacobs Douwe Egbers (JDE).

There is an interest in making the coffee industry fairer. Consumer research has found that 53% of U.S. coffee drinkers want to buy ethical coffee and are willing to pay $1.31 extra for a cup of coffee produced by a cooperative farmer.


Episode 56 - Ethical Coffee

Coffee beans are the inner seed from the “cherry” of the coffea plant, which is native to Ethiopia.[1] Coffee is the world’s second most tradable commodity, after crude oil. There are four primary types of coffee: Arabica (coffea arabica), Robusta (coffea caniphora), Liberica (coffea liberica), and Exelsa (coffea liberica var. dewervrei).

Arabica is the most common type of coffee consumed in North America. Arabica beans are sweet less acidic in flavour than Robusta beans. They are farmed in areas with high elevations above sea level and where rain is prevalent. Arabica plants are delicate and prone to disease, which makes it challenging to grow in large quantities.

Robusta beans are most popular in Europe, the Middle East, and Africa. It is not generally very popular because it can taste burnt or rubbery. But Robusta coffee is easier to grow and has higher levels of caffeine (which acts as a natural insect repellant). It is typically used in instant coffee and as a filler in dark roasts. There are some very good Robusta coffees, but this variety is usually seen as lower quality.

Liberica and Excelsa are both relatively rare coffee beans.

You can grow a coffee plant in your apartment, but don’t expect it to produce coffee cherries. Coffee plants are trees that yield mature harvests only after 4-7 years of attentive cultivation.[2]

There are lots of different coffee brewing styles (e.g., drip, pour over, cold brew, espresso, ristretto). Capsule coffee is a rising trend. More than 40% of U.S. households own an espresso pod machine. The global market for coffee pod and capsule machines is expected to double by 2025.

There is also a wide variety of coffee drink types (e.g., espresso, americano, cappuccino, flat white, affogato, iced coffee) but we won’t get into those.

How Coffee is Made

When coffee cherries are picked, the beans are removed either through a “dry” or “wet” process. The dry process involves leaving the beans in the sun to dry and then running them through a grinder. In the wet process, you use water to wash the fruit away from the seed. The “green” coffee beans are then “cleaned” (inspected and sorted) and then roasted.

A (Brief) History of Coffee

Four hundred years ago, coffee was a “mysterious Ottoman custom” cultivated commercially only in Yemen.[3] Now it is an “unrivalled work drug” and a ubiquitous daily necessity.[4] It is also a cash crop produced by more than 25 million people in over 70 countries.[5]

The word coffee derives from the Arabic “qahwah”, meaning wine: coffee is the wine of Islam.[6] Early coffee cultivation took place in the sixteenth century on the hillsides of Yemen.[7] The Ottoman empire set up a coffeehouse as one of its first actions after conquering a new city, to demonstrate the civility of their rule.[8]

Coffee became a European luxury in the seventeenth century as Europeans brought the tradition back from visits in the Middle East. Coffee was especially popular in England. The first coffeehouse in London was established in the early 1650s, but by the turn of the 18th century there were several hundred coffeehouses there.[9]

British traders had more success trading for tea than coffee, which is one reason that England is today associated more with tea than coffee.[10]

Arab traders in Yemen monopolized coffee production until 1699, when the Dutch successfully introduced coffee to Java.[11]After that, coffee spread around the world through pathways of empire and slavery.[12] After the Dutch, the French colonial administrators took coffee to Africa. Then the Dutch introduced coffee to Suriname. Then a Portuguese official smuggled coffee from French Guiana to Brazil. The British began cultivating coffee in Jamaica and the Spanish established coffee in Cuba. By the end of the 18th century coffee was virtually everywhere in the Americas.[13]

The Coffee Industry

The total value of the global coffee industry was $465.9 billion in 2020 (this was a huge jump from 2019). 10.21 million bags of coffee were exported in 2020.

People around the world drink coffee, but the Aussies may be the most committed market. Even though the U.S. population is 12x the Australian population, the Australian coffee market ($7.8 billion) is more than half as much as the U.S. coffee market ($14 billion).

The world’s top coffee exporters include: Brazil, Vietnam, Colombia, Honduras, and Indonesia. Canada’s top coffee supplying countries are Brazil, Peru, Colombia, Nicaragua, Guatemala, and Mexico.

Around 125 million people globally depend on coffee for their livelihoods. Unlike some commodities, which are grown on large plantations, small coffee farms proliferate: smallholder farmers produce 80% of the world’s coffee.

Like other agricultural commodities, farmworkers receive very little of the value added from coffee. Coffee farmers typically earn only 7-10% of the retail price of coffee. The rest goes to traders, roasters, and retailers downstream.

In part, this has to do with the concentration of coffee buying and processing. Three coffee buyers control half of the global coffee trade (ECOM, Neumann and Volcafe). And 40% of coffee is processed by the ten largest coffee roasters, including Nestlé and Jacobs Douwe Egbers (JDE).

There is an interest in making the coffee industry fairer. Consumer research has found that 53% of U.S. coffee drinkers want to buy ethical coffee and are willing to pay $1.31 extra for a cup of coffee produced by a cooperative farmer.


Episode 56 - Ethical Coffee

Coffee beans are the inner seed from the “cherry” of the coffea plant, which is native to Ethiopia.[1] Coffee is the world’s second most tradable commodity, after crude oil. There are four primary types of coffee: Arabica (coffea arabica), Robusta (coffea caniphora), Liberica (coffea liberica), and Exelsa (coffea liberica var. dewervrei).

Arabica is the most common type of coffee consumed in North America. Arabica beans are sweet less acidic in flavour than Robusta beans. They are farmed in areas with high elevations above sea level and where rain is prevalent. Arabica plants are delicate and prone to disease, which makes it challenging to grow in large quantities.

Robusta beans are most popular in Europe, the Middle East, and Africa. It is not generally very popular because it can taste burnt or rubbery. But Robusta coffee is easier to grow and has higher levels of caffeine (which acts as a natural insect repellant). It is typically used in instant coffee and as a filler in dark roasts. There are some very good Robusta coffees, but this variety is usually seen as lower quality.

Liberica and Excelsa are both relatively rare coffee beans.

You can grow a coffee plant in your apartment, but don’t expect it to produce coffee cherries. Coffee plants are trees that yield mature harvests only after 4-7 years of attentive cultivation.[2]

There are lots of different coffee brewing styles (e.g., drip, pour over, cold brew, espresso, ristretto). Capsule coffee is a rising trend. More than 40% of U.S. households own an espresso pod machine. The global market for coffee pod and capsule machines is expected to double by 2025.

There is also a wide variety of coffee drink types (e.g., espresso, americano, cappuccino, flat white, affogato, iced coffee) but we won’t get into those.

How Coffee is Made

When coffee cherries are picked, the beans are removed either through a “dry” or “wet” process. The dry process involves leaving the beans in the sun to dry and then running them through a grinder. In the wet process, you use water to wash the fruit away from the seed. The “green” coffee beans are then “cleaned” (inspected and sorted) and then roasted.

A (Brief) History of Coffee

Four hundred years ago, coffee was a “mysterious Ottoman custom” cultivated commercially only in Yemen.[3] Now it is an “unrivalled work drug” and a ubiquitous daily necessity.[4] It is also a cash crop produced by more than 25 million people in over 70 countries.[5]

The word coffee derives from the Arabic “qahwah”, meaning wine: coffee is the wine of Islam.[6] Early coffee cultivation took place in the sixteenth century on the hillsides of Yemen.[7] The Ottoman empire set up a coffeehouse as one of its first actions after conquering a new city, to demonstrate the civility of their rule.[8]

Coffee became a European luxury in the seventeenth century as Europeans brought the tradition back from visits in the Middle East. Coffee was especially popular in England. The first coffeehouse in London was established in the early 1650s, but by the turn of the 18th century there were several hundred coffeehouses there.[9]

British traders had more success trading for tea than coffee, which is one reason that England is today associated more with tea than coffee.[10]

Arab traders in Yemen monopolized coffee production until 1699, when the Dutch successfully introduced coffee to Java.[11]After that, coffee spread around the world through pathways of empire and slavery.[12] After the Dutch, the French colonial administrators took coffee to Africa. Then the Dutch introduced coffee to Suriname. Then a Portuguese official smuggled coffee from French Guiana to Brazil. The British began cultivating coffee in Jamaica and the Spanish established coffee in Cuba. By the end of the 18th century coffee was virtually everywhere in the Americas.[13]

The Coffee Industry

The total value of the global coffee industry was $465.9 billion in 2020 (this was a huge jump from 2019). 10.21 million bags of coffee were exported in 2020.

People around the world drink coffee, but the Aussies may be the most committed market. Even though the U.S. population is 12x the Australian population, the Australian coffee market ($7.8 billion) is more than half as much as the U.S. coffee market ($14 billion).

The world’s top coffee exporters include: Brazil, Vietnam, Colombia, Honduras, and Indonesia. Canada’s top coffee supplying countries are Brazil, Peru, Colombia, Nicaragua, Guatemala, and Mexico.

Around 125 million people globally depend on coffee for their livelihoods. Unlike some commodities, which are grown on large plantations, small coffee farms proliferate: smallholder farmers produce 80% of the world’s coffee.

Like other agricultural commodities, farmworkers receive very little of the value added from coffee. Coffee farmers typically earn only 7-10% of the retail price of coffee. The rest goes to traders, roasters, and retailers downstream.

In part, this has to do with the concentration of coffee buying and processing. Three coffee buyers control half of the global coffee trade (ECOM, Neumann and Volcafe). And 40% of coffee is processed by the ten largest coffee roasters, including Nestlé and Jacobs Douwe Egbers (JDE).

There is an interest in making the coffee industry fairer. Consumer research has found that 53% of U.S. coffee drinkers want to buy ethical coffee and are willing to pay $1.31 extra for a cup of coffee produced by a cooperative farmer.


Episode 56 - Ethical Coffee

Coffee beans are the inner seed from the “cherry” of the coffea plant, which is native to Ethiopia.[1] Coffee is the world’s second most tradable commodity, after crude oil. There are four primary types of coffee: Arabica (coffea arabica), Robusta (coffea caniphora), Liberica (coffea liberica), and Exelsa (coffea liberica var. dewervrei).

Arabica is the most common type of coffee consumed in North America. Arabica beans are sweet less acidic in flavour than Robusta beans. They are farmed in areas with high elevations above sea level and where rain is prevalent. Arabica plants are delicate and prone to disease, which makes it challenging to grow in large quantities.

Robusta beans are most popular in Europe, the Middle East, and Africa. It is not generally very popular because it can taste burnt or rubbery. But Robusta coffee is easier to grow and has higher levels of caffeine (which acts as a natural insect repellant). It is typically used in instant coffee and as a filler in dark roasts. There are some very good Robusta coffees, but this variety is usually seen as lower quality.

Liberica and Excelsa are both relatively rare coffee beans.

You can grow a coffee plant in your apartment, but don’t expect it to produce coffee cherries. Coffee plants are trees that yield mature harvests only after 4-7 years of attentive cultivation.[2]

There are lots of different coffee brewing styles (e.g., drip, pour over, cold brew, espresso, ristretto). Capsule coffee is a rising trend. More than 40% of U.S. households own an espresso pod machine. The global market for coffee pod and capsule machines is expected to double by 2025.

There is also a wide variety of coffee drink types (e.g., espresso, americano, cappuccino, flat white, affogato, iced coffee) but we won’t get into those.

How Coffee is Made

When coffee cherries are picked, the beans are removed either through a “dry” or “wet” process. The dry process involves leaving the beans in the sun to dry and then running them through a grinder. In the wet process, you use water to wash the fruit away from the seed. The “green” coffee beans are then “cleaned” (inspected and sorted) and then roasted.

A (Brief) History of Coffee

Four hundred years ago, coffee was a “mysterious Ottoman custom” cultivated commercially only in Yemen.[3] Now it is an “unrivalled work drug” and a ubiquitous daily necessity.[4] It is also a cash crop produced by more than 25 million people in over 70 countries.[5]

The word coffee derives from the Arabic “qahwah”, meaning wine: coffee is the wine of Islam.[6] Early coffee cultivation took place in the sixteenth century on the hillsides of Yemen.[7] The Ottoman empire set up a coffeehouse as one of its first actions after conquering a new city, to demonstrate the civility of their rule.[8]

Coffee became a European luxury in the seventeenth century as Europeans brought the tradition back from visits in the Middle East. Coffee was especially popular in England. The first coffeehouse in London was established in the early 1650s, but by the turn of the 18th century there were several hundred coffeehouses there.[9]

British traders had more success trading for tea than coffee, which is one reason that England is today associated more with tea than coffee.[10]

Arab traders in Yemen monopolized coffee production until 1699, when the Dutch successfully introduced coffee to Java.[11]After that, coffee spread around the world through pathways of empire and slavery.[12] After the Dutch, the French colonial administrators took coffee to Africa. Then the Dutch introduced coffee to Suriname. Then a Portuguese official smuggled coffee from French Guiana to Brazil. The British began cultivating coffee in Jamaica and the Spanish established coffee in Cuba. By the end of the 18th century coffee was virtually everywhere in the Americas.[13]

The Coffee Industry

The total value of the global coffee industry was $465.9 billion in 2020 (this was a huge jump from 2019). 10.21 million bags of coffee were exported in 2020.

People around the world drink coffee, but the Aussies may be the most committed market. Even though the U.S. population is 12x the Australian population, the Australian coffee market ($7.8 billion) is more than half as much as the U.S. coffee market ($14 billion).

The world’s top coffee exporters include: Brazil, Vietnam, Colombia, Honduras, and Indonesia. Canada’s top coffee supplying countries are Brazil, Peru, Colombia, Nicaragua, Guatemala, and Mexico.

Around 125 million people globally depend on coffee for their livelihoods. Unlike some commodities, which are grown on large plantations, small coffee farms proliferate: smallholder farmers produce 80% of the world’s coffee.

Like other agricultural commodities, farmworkers receive very little of the value added from coffee. Coffee farmers typically earn only 7-10% of the retail price of coffee. The rest goes to traders, roasters, and retailers downstream.

In part, this has to do with the concentration of coffee buying and processing. Three coffee buyers control half of the global coffee trade (ECOM, Neumann and Volcafe). And 40% of coffee is processed by the ten largest coffee roasters, including Nestlé and Jacobs Douwe Egbers (JDE).

There is an interest in making the coffee industry fairer. Consumer research has found that 53% of U.S. coffee drinkers want to buy ethical coffee and are willing to pay $1.31 extra for a cup of coffee produced by a cooperative farmer.


Episode 56 - Ethical Coffee

Coffee beans are the inner seed from the “cherry” of the coffea plant, which is native to Ethiopia.[1] Coffee is the world’s second most tradable commodity, after crude oil. There are four primary types of coffee: Arabica (coffea arabica), Robusta (coffea caniphora), Liberica (coffea liberica), and Exelsa (coffea liberica var. dewervrei).

Arabica is the most common type of coffee consumed in North America. Arabica beans are sweet less acidic in flavour than Robusta beans. They are farmed in areas with high elevations above sea level and where rain is prevalent. Arabica plants are delicate and prone to disease, which makes it challenging to grow in large quantities.

Robusta beans are most popular in Europe, the Middle East, and Africa. It is not generally very popular because it can taste burnt or rubbery. But Robusta coffee is easier to grow and has higher levels of caffeine (which acts as a natural insect repellant). It is typically used in instant coffee and as a filler in dark roasts. There are some very good Robusta coffees, but this variety is usually seen as lower quality.

Liberica and Excelsa are both relatively rare coffee beans.

You can grow a coffee plant in your apartment, but don’t expect it to produce coffee cherries. Coffee plants are trees that yield mature harvests only after 4-7 years of attentive cultivation.[2]

There are lots of different coffee brewing styles (e.g., drip, pour over, cold brew, espresso, ristretto). Capsule coffee is a rising trend. More than 40% of U.S. households own an espresso pod machine. The global market for coffee pod and capsule machines is expected to double by 2025.

There is also a wide variety of coffee drink types (e.g., espresso, americano, cappuccino, flat white, affogato, iced coffee) but we won’t get into those.

How Coffee is Made

When coffee cherries are picked, the beans are removed either through a “dry” or “wet” process. The dry process involves leaving the beans in the sun to dry and then running them through a grinder. In the wet process, you use water to wash the fruit away from the seed. The “green” coffee beans are then “cleaned” (inspected and sorted) and then roasted.

A (Brief) History of Coffee

Four hundred years ago, coffee was a “mysterious Ottoman custom” cultivated commercially only in Yemen.[3] Now it is an “unrivalled work drug” and a ubiquitous daily necessity.[4] It is also a cash crop produced by more than 25 million people in over 70 countries.[5]

The word coffee derives from the Arabic “qahwah”, meaning wine: coffee is the wine of Islam.[6] Early coffee cultivation took place in the sixteenth century on the hillsides of Yemen.[7] The Ottoman empire set up a coffeehouse as one of its first actions after conquering a new city, to demonstrate the civility of their rule.[8]

Coffee became a European luxury in the seventeenth century as Europeans brought the tradition back from visits in the Middle East. Coffee was especially popular in England. The first coffeehouse in London was established in the early 1650s, but by the turn of the 18th century there were several hundred coffeehouses there.[9]

British traders had more success trading for tea than coffee, which is one reason that England is today associated more with tea than coffee.[10]

Arab traders in Yemen monopolized coffee production until 1699, when the Dutch successfully introduced coffee to Java.[11]After that, coffee spread around the world through pathways of empire and slavery.[12] After the Dutch, the French colonial administrators took coffee to Africa. Then the Dutch introduced coffee to Suriname. Then a Portuguese official smuggled coffee from French Guiana to Brazil. The British began cultivating coffee in Jamaica and the Spanish established coffee in Cuba. By the end of the 18th century coffee was virtually everywhere in the Americas.[13]

The Coffee Industry

The total value of the global coffee industry was $465.9 billion in 2020 (this was a huge jump from 2019). 10.21 million bags of coffee were exported in 2020.

People around the world drink coffee, but the Aussies may be the most committed market. Even though the U.S. population is 12x the Australian population, the Australian coffee market ($7.8 billion) is more than half as much as the U.S. coffee market ($14 billion).

The world’s top coffee exporters include: Brazil, Vietnam, Colombia, Honduras, and Indonesia. Canada’s top coffee supplying countries are Brazil, Peru, Colombia, Nicaragua, Guatemala, and Mexico.

Around 125 million people globally depend on coffee for their livelihoods. Unlike some commodities, which are grown on large plantations, small coffee farms proliferate: smallholder farmers produce 80% of the world’s coffee.

Like other agricultural commodities, farmworkers receive very little of the value added from coffee. Coffee farmers typically earn only 7-10% of the retail price of coffee. The rest goes to traders, roasters, and retailers downstream.

In part, this has to do with the concentration of coffee buying and processing. Three coffee buyers control half of the global coffee trade (ECOM, Neumann and Volcafe). And 40% of coffee is processed by the ten largest coffee roasters, including Nestlé and Jacobs Douwe Egbers (JDE).

There is an interest in making the coffee industry fairer. Consumer research has found that 53% of U.S. coffee drinkers want to buy ethical coffee and are willing to pay $1.31 extra for a cup of coffee produced by a cooperative farmer.


Episode 56 - Ethical Coffee

Coffee beans are the inner seed from the “cherry” of the coffea plant, which is native to Ethiopia.[1] Coffee is the world’s second most tradable commodity, after crude oil. There are four primary types of coffee: Arabica (coffea arabica), Robusta (coffea caniphora), Liberica (coffea liberica), and Exelsa (coffea liberica var. dewervrei).

Arabica is the most common type of coffee consumed in North America. Arabica beans are sweet less acidic in flavour than Robusta beans. They are farmed in areas with high elevations above sea level and where rain is prevalent. Arabica plants are delicate and prone to disease, which makes it challenging to grow in large quantities.

Robusta beans are most popular in Europe, the Middle East, and Africa. It is not generally very popular because it can taste burnt or rubbery. But Robusta coffee is easier to grow and has higher levels of caffeine (which acts as a natural insect repellant). It is typically used in instant coffee and as a filler in dark roasts. There are some very good Robusta coffees, but this variety is usually seen as lower quality.

Liberica and Excelsa are both relatively rare coffee beans.

You can grow a coffee plant in your apartment, but don’t expect it to produce coffee cherries. Coffee plants are trees that yield mature harvests only after 4-7 years of attentive cultivation.[2]

There are lots of different coffee brewing styles (e.g., drip, pour over, cold brew, espresso, ristretto). Capsule coffee is a rising trend. More than 40% of U.S. households own an espresso pod machine. The global market for coffee pod and capsule machines is expected to double by 2025.

There is also a wide variety of coffee drink types (e.g., espresso, americano, cappuccino, flat white, affogato, iced coffee) but we won’t get into those.

How Coffee is Made

When coffee cherries are picked, the beans are removed either through a “dry” or “wet” process. The dry process involves leaving the beans in the sun to dry and then running them through a grinder. In the wet process, you use water to wash the fruit away from the seed. The “green” coffee beans are then “cleaned” (inspected and sorted) and then roasted.

A (Brief) History of Coffee

Four hundred years ago, coffee was a “mysterious Ottoman custom” cultivated commercially only in Yemen.[3] Now it is an “unrivalled work drug” and a ubiquitous daily necessity.[4] It is also a cash crop produced by more than 25 million people in over 70 countries.[5]

The word coffee derives from the Arabic “qahwah”, meaning wine: coffee is the wine of Islam.[6] Early coffee cultivation took place in the sixteenth century on the hillsides of Yemen.[7] The Ottoman empire set up a coffeehouse as one of its first actions after conquering a new city, to demonstrate the civility of their rule.[8]

Coffee became a European luxury in the seventeenth century as Europeans brought the tradition back from visits in the Middle East. Coffee was especially popular in England. The first coffeehouse in London was established in the early 1650s, but by the turn of the 18th century there were several hundred coffeehouses there.[9]

British traders had more success trading for tea than coffee, which is one reason that England is today associated more with tea than coffee.[10]

Arab traders in Yemen monopolized coffee production until 1699, when the Dutch successfully introduced coffee to Java.[11]After that, coffee spread around the world through pathways of empire and slavery.[12] After the Dutch, the French colonial administrators took coffee to Africa. Then the Dutch introduced coffee to Suriname. Then a Portuguese official smuggled coffee from French Guiana to Brazil. The British began cultivating coffee in Jamaica and the Spanish established coffee in Cuba. By the end of the 18th century coffee was virtually everywhere in the Americas.[13]

The Coffee Industry

The total value of the global coffee industry was $465.9 billion in 2020 (this was a huge jump from 2019). 10.21 million bags of coffee were exported in 2020.

People around the world drink coffee, but the Aussies may be the most committed market. Even though the U.S. population is 12x the Australian population, the Australian coffee market ($7.8 billion) is more than half as much as the U.S. coffee market ($14 billion).

The world’s top coffee exporters include: Brazil, Vietnam, Colombia, Honduras, and Indonesia. Canada’s top coffee supplying countries are Brazil, Peru, Colombia, Nicaragua, Guatemala, and Mexico.

Around 125 million people globally depend on coffee for their livelihoods. Unlike some commodities, which are grown on large plantations, small coffee farms proliferate: smallholder farmers produce 80% of the world’s coffee.

Like other agricultural commodities, farmworkers receive very little of the value added from coffee. Coffee farmers typically earn only 7-10% of the retail price of coffee. The rest goes to traders, roasters, and retailers downstream.

In part, this has to do with the concentration of coffee buying and processing. Three coffee buyers control half of the global coffee trade (ECOM, Neumann and Volcafe). And 40% of coffee is processed by the ten largest coffee roasters, including Nestlé and Jacobs Douwe Egbers (JDE).

There is an interest in making the coffee industry fairer. Consumer research has found that 53% of U.S. coffee drinkers want to buy ethical coffee and are willing to pay $1.31 extra for a cup of coffee produced by a cooperative farmer.


Watch the video: Donut Finisher Adds Final Touch to Tasty Treats (June 2022).


Comments:

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  2. Raedmund

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  3. Briar

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  4. Rowyn

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  7. Chris

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