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Food and Drink for Winners

Food and Drink for Winners


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A look at the foods and drinks inspired by Charlie Sheen.

Wikimedia Commons/Angela George

Charlie Sheen

Charlie Sheen's bizarre media appearances have captured the nation's attention during the past several weeks. Predictably, his outlandish antics and unforgettable catchphrases have inspired the creation of dishes, drinks, and food and drink related paraphernalia.

Drink
Bloody Mary: New York's Hash Fifty-Five unveiled a new Bloody Mary called "Tiger's Blood with a Dash of Adonis DNA."
Tiger Blood Cocktail: Chicago's Longman & Eagle created a cocktail with Fighting Cock Kentucky Bourbon, Carpano Antica, Pedro Ximenez Solera 1927, and bourbon barrel aged bitters.

Food
Sandwich: Dudefood.com honored Sheen with a sandwich made with vodka and tequila marinated chicken, smoked ham and turkey, sharp Cheddar, two sunny-side up eggs, and beer bread.
Hot Dog: The Infield, a hot dog stand in Sherman Oaks, Calif. created a Charlie Dog with Tiger Blood, which Sheen promoted via Twitter. It was dressed Chicago-style with hot sauce on top.
Fast Food: Amidst rumors of a McLobster, McDonald's tweeted that they've started working on the McWinning.
Burger: Harvard hang-out, Mr. Bartley's Burgers cooks up a Charlie Sheen Burger topped with grilled peppers, onions, mushrooms, and teriyaki sauce.

Dessert
Cake: On March 2nd, Sheen tweeted a photo of his Oscars cake.

Products
Paraphernalia: Cafepress.com released Tiger Blood mugs, thermoses, and steins.

Sheen, Food, and Film
Film: OC Weekly rounded up Sheen's best food film moments.
Video: Charlie Sheen posted a cooking video on FunnyorDie.com called "Charlie Sheen WINNING Recipes."

The Daily Byte is a regular column dedicated to covering interesting food news and trends across the country. Click here for previous columns.


Why Red Food & Drinks Are Consumed on Juneteenth & 8 Recipes You Can Make at Home

When we hear the words Independence Day, most of us think of the 4th of July, the day America gained its freedom from Great Britain. But there&rsquos another Freedom Day that is not as well-known, though it holds even greater significance to many African Americans. Juneteenth, Freedom Day or even Jubilee Day is the day that Union General Gordon Granger read a federal order that would free the last enslaved people in Galveston, Texas, a good two years after the Emancipation Proclamation was signed. It became a joyous day to celebrate, first in Texas, and then in other parts of America as black people migrated.

Typical Juneteenth activities have included everything from prayer, parades, rodeos, fairs, educational lectures, musical performances and, of course, food (we&rsquoll get back to that in a sec). While Juneteenth has gained and lost popularity over the years, it&rsquos definitely experiencing a resurgence. Institutions such as the Smithsonian and the Henry Ford Museum have begun sponsoring Juneteenth activities, SheKnows, Twitter, Nike and the NFL have announced they will make Juneteenth a paid company holiday, and activists are campaigning for the United States Congress to recognize Juneteenth as a national holiday. Clearly, the political climate and rise of Black Lives Matter has given Juneteenth an even greater boost this year. Currently, there are over 275 events planned across the country, virtually and in-person, to serve as a show of Black love and resistance. Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam who is pushing to make it a holiday in his state explained recently, &ldquo(Juneteenth) matters now because it says to the black community, this is not just your history, this is everyone&rsquos shared history, and we recognize it together.” Yesssss.

Now, back to the food. You&rsquoll find soul food favorites like fried chicken, collard greens, and potato salad at any Juneteenth celebration, but it&rsquos the red rice, red sausage, red velvet cake and red fruit punch that really make it an official Juneteenth. The color red is said to represent the blood shed throughout enslavement, and some say it traces back to parts of West Africa where red drinks marked special occasions and red is symbolic of spiritual power.

With so many reasons to celebrate Juneteeth, what are you waiting for? Oh, wait, did I hear someone say, &lsquorecipes?&rsquo Don&rsquot worry, we got you covered. Here are some red food and drink recipes that are sure to make this Juneteenth fun for the entire family.

BBQ Sauce

Barbecue was and still is central to a Juneteenth celebration, and we wouldn&rsquot expect anything less from a holiday that originated in Texas. Since we already know you&rsquore going to flex your skills on the grill, we found you the perfect barbeque sauce that can be used as a condiment or marinade. Brought to you by FoodNetwork stars, the Neely’s, Neely&rsquos BBQ Sauce recipe is great if you follow it to the letter, but it&rsquos even better if you make it your own.

Black-Eyed Pea Salad

While Black Americans traditionally eat black-eyed peas hot on New Year&rsquos Day to bring forth prosperity for the coming year, you can&rsquot go wrong with this light, salad version. Ingredients like fresh parsley and rice wine vinegar make it the perfect sidekick to your chicken or pork. Just make sure to make enough because this is not a time when less is more!


Why Red Food & Drinks Are Consumed on Juneteenth & 8 Recipes You Can Make at Home

When we hear the words Independence Day, most of us think of the 4th of July, the day America gained its freedom from Great Britain. But there&rsquos another Freedom Day that is not as well-known, though it holds even greater significance to many African Americans. Juneteenth, Freedom Day or even Jubilee Day is the day that Union General Gordon Granger read a federal order that would free the last enslaved people in Galveston, Texas, a good two years after the Emancipation Proclamation was signed. It became a joyous day to celebrate, first in Texas, and then in other parts of America as black people migrated.

Typical Juneteenth activities have included everything from prayer, parades, rodeos, fairs, educational lectures, musical performances and, of course, food (we&rsquoll get back to that in a sec). While Juneteenth has gained and lost popularity over the years, it&rsquos definitely experiencing a resurgence. Institutions such as the Smithsonian and the Henry Ford Museum have begun sponsoring Juneteenth activities, SheKnows, Twitter, Nike and the NFL have announced they will make Juneteenth a paid company holiday, and activists are campaigning for the United States Congress to recognize Juneteenth as a national holiday. Clearly, the political climate and rise of Black Lives Matter has given Juneteenth an even greater boost this year. Currently, there are over 275 events planned across the country, virtually and in-person, to serve as a show of Black love and resistance. Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam who is pushing to make it a holiday in his state explained recently, &ldquo(Juneteenth) matters now because it says to the black community, this is not just your history, this is everyone&rsquos shared history, and we recognize it together.” Yesssss.

Now, back to the food. You&rsquoll find soul food favorites like fried chicken, collard greens, and potato salad at any Juneteenth celebration, but it&rsquos the red rice, red sausage, red velvet cake and red fruit punch that really make it an official Juneteenth. The color red is said to represent the blood shed throughout enslavement, and some say it traces back to parts of West Africa where red drinks marked special occasions and red is symbolic of spiritual power.

With so many reasons to celebrate Juneteeth, what are you waiting for? Oh, wait, did I hear someone say, &lsquorecipes?&rsquo Don&rsquot worry, we got you covered. Here are some red food and drink recipes that are sure to make this Juneteenth fun for the entire family.

BBQ Sauce

Barbecue was and still is central to a Juneteenth celebration, and we wouldn&rsquot expect anything less from a holiday that originated in Texas. Since we already know you&rsquore going to flex your skills on the grill, we found you the perfect barbeque sauce that can be used as a condiment or marinade. Brought to you by FoodNetwork stars, the Neely’s, Neely&rsquos BBQ Sauce recipe is great if you follow it to the letter, but it&rsquos even better if you make it your own.

Black-Eyed Pea Salad

While Black Americans traditionally eat black-eyed peas hot on New Year&rsquos Day to bring forth prosperity for the coming year, you can&rsquot go wrong with this light, salad version. Ingredients like fresh parsley and rice wine vinegar make it the perfect sidekick to your chicken or pork. Just make sure to make enough because this is not a time when less is more!


Why Red Food & Drinks Are Consumed on Juneteenth & 8 Recipes You Can Make at Home

When we hear the words Independence Day, most of us think of the 4th of July, the day America gained its freedom from Great Britain. But there&rsquos another Freedom Day that is not as well-known, though it holds even greater significance to many African Americans. Juneteenth, Freedom Day or even Jubilee Day is the day that Union General Gordon Granger read a federal order that would free the last enslaved people in Galveston, Texas, a good two years after the Emancipation Proclamation was signed. It became a joyous day to celebrate, first in Texas, and then in other parts of America as black people migrated.

Typical Juneteenth activities have included everything from prayer, parades, rodeos, fairs, educational lectures, musical performances and, of course, food (we&rsquoll get back to that in a sec). While Juneteenth has gained and lost popularity over the years, it&rsquos definitely experiencing a resurgence. Institutions such as the Smithsonian and the Henry Ford Museum have begun sponsoring Juneteenth activities, SheKnows, Twitter, Nike and the NFL have announced they will make Juneteenth a paid company holiday, and activists are campaigning for the United States Congress to recognize Juneteenth as a national holiday. Clearly, the political climate and rise of Black Lives Matter has given Juneteenth an even greater boost this year. Currently, there are over 275 events planned across the country, virtually and in-person, to serve as a show of Black love and resistance. Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam who is pushing to make it a holiday in his state explained recently, &ldquo(Juneteenth) matters now because it says to the black community, this is not just your history, this is everyone&rsquos shared history, and we recognize it together.” Yesssss.

Now, back to the food. You&rsquoll find soul food favorites like fried chicken, collard greens, and potato salad at any Juneteenth celebration, but it&rsquos the red rice, red sausage, red velvet cake and red fruit punch that really make it an official Juneteenth. The color red is said to represent the blood shed throughout enslavement, and some say it traces back to parts of West Africa where red drinks marked special occasions and red is symbolic of spiritual power.

With so many reasons to celebrate Juneteeth, what are you waiting for? Oh, wait, did I hear someone say, &lsquorecipes?&rsquo Don&rsquot worry, we got you covered. Here are some red food and drink recipes that are sure to make this Juneteenth fun for the entire family.

BBQ Sauce

Barbecue was and still is central to a Juneteenth celebration, and we wouldn&rsquot expect anything less from a holiday that originated in Texas. Since we already know you&rsquore going to flex your skills on the grill, we found you the perfect barbeque sauce that can be used as a condiment or marinade. Brought to you by FoodNetwork stars, the Neely’s, Neely&rsquos BBQ Sauce recipe is great if you follow it to the letter, but it&rsquos even better if you make it your own.

Black-Eyed Pea Salad

While Black Americans traditionally eat black-eyed peas hot on New Year&rsquos Day to bring forth prosperity for the coming year, you can&rsquot go wrong with this light, salad version. Ingredients like fresh parsley and rice wine vinegar make it the perfect sidekick to your chicken or pork. Just make sure to make enough because this is not a time when less is more!


Why Red Food & Drinks Are Consumed on Juneteenth & 8 Recipes You Can Make at Home

When we hear the words Independence Day, most of us think of the 4th of July, the day America gained its freedom from Great Britain. But there&rsquos another Freedom Day that is not as well-known, though it holds even greater significance to many African Americans. Juneteenth, Freedom Day or even Jubilee Day is the day that Union General Gordon Granger read a federal order that would free the last enslaved people in Galveston, Texas, a good two years after the Emancipation Proclamation was signed. It became a joyous day to celebrate, first in Texas, and then in other parts of America as black people migrated.

Typical Juneteenth activities have included everything from prayer, parades, rodeos, fairs, educational lectures, musical performances and, of course, food (we&rsquoll get back to that in a sec). While Juneteenth has gained and lost popularity over the years, it&rsquos definitely experiencing a resurgence. Institutions such as the Smithsonian and the Henry Ford Museum have begun sponsoring Juneteenth activities, SheKnows, Twitter, Nike and the NFL have announced they will make Juneteenth a paid company holiday, and activists are campaigning for the United States Congress to recognize Juneteenth as a national holiday. Clearly, the political climate and rise of Black Lives Matter has given Juneteenth an even greater boost this year. Currently, there are over 275 events planned across the country, virtually and in-person, to serve as a show of Black love and resistance. Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam who is pushing to make it a holiday in his state explained recently, &ldquo(Juneteenth) matters now because it says to the black community, this is not just your history, this is everyone&rsquos shared history, and we recognize it together.” Yesssss.

Now, back to the food. You&rsquoll find soul food favorites like fried chicken, collard greens, and potato salad at any Juneteenth celebration, but it&rsquos the red rice, red sausage, red velvet cake and red fruit punch that really make it an official Juneteenth. The color red is said to represent the blood shed throughout enslavement, and some say it traces back to parts of West Africa where red drinks marked special occasions and red is symbolic of spiritual power.

With so many reasons to celebrate Juneteeth, what are you waiting for? Oh, wait, did I hear someone say, &lsquorecipes?&rsquo Don&rsquot worry, we got you covered. Here are some red food and drink recipes that are sure to make this Juneteenth fun for the entire family.

BBQ Sauce

Barbecue was and still is central to a Juneteenth celebration, and we wouldn&rsquot expect anything less from a holiday that originated in Texas. Since we already know you&rsquore going to flex your skills on the grill, we found you the perfect barbeque sauce that can be used as a condiment or marinade. Brought to you by FoodNetwork stars, the Neely’s, Neely&rsquos BBQ Sauce recipe is great if you follow it to the letter, but it&rsquos even better if you make it your own.

Black-Eyed Pea Salad

While Black Americans traditionally eat black-eyed peas hot on New Year&rsquos Day to bring forth prosperity for the coming year, you can&rsquot go wrong with this light, salad version. Ingredients like fresh parsley and rice wine vinegar make it the perfect sidekick to your chicken or pork. Just make sure to make enough because this is not a time when less is more!


Why Red Food & Drinks Are Consumed on Juneteenth & 8 Recipes You Can Make at Home

When we hear the words Independence Day, most of us think of the 4th of July, the day America gained its freedom from Great Britain. But there&rsquos another Freedom Day that is not as well-known, though it holds even greater significance to many African Americans. Juneteenth, Freedom Day or even Jubilee Day is the day that Union General Gordon Granger read a federal order that would free the last enslaved people in Galveston, Texas, a good two years after the Emancipation Proclamation was signed. It became a joyous day to celebrate, first in Texas, and then in other parts of America as black people migrated.

Typical Juneteenth activities have included everything from prayer, parades, rodeos, fairs, educational lectures, musical performances and, of course, food (we&rsquoll get back to that in a sec). While Juneteenth has gained and lost popularity over the years, it&rsquos definitely experiencing a resurgence. Institutions such as the Smithsonian and the Henry Ford Museum have begun sponsoring Juneteenth activities, SheKnows, Twitter, Nike and the NFL have announced they will make Juneteenth a paid company holiday, and activists are campaigning for the United States Congress to recognize Juneteenth as a national holiday. Clearly, the political climate and rise of Black Lives Matter has given Juneteenth an even greater boost this year. Currently, there are over 275 events planned across the country, virtually and in-person, to serve as a show of Black love and resistance. Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam who is pushing to make it a holiday in his state explained recently, &ldquo(Juneteenth) matters now because it says to the black community, this is not just your history, this is everyone&rsquos shared history, and we recognize it together.” Yesssss.

Now, back to the food. You&rsquoll find soul food favorites like fried chicken, collard greens, and potato salad at any Juneteenth celebration, but it&rsquos the red rice, red sausage, red velvet cake and red fruit punch that really make it an official Juneteenth. The color red is said to represent the blood shed throughout enslavement, and some say it traces back to parts of West Africa where red drinks marked special occasions and red is symbolic of spiritual power.

With so many reasons to celebrate Juneteeth, what are you waiting for? Oh, wait, did I hear someone say, &lsquorecipes?&rsquo Don&rsquot worry, we got you covered. Here are some red food and drink recipes that are sure to make this Juneteenth fun for the entire family.

BBQ Sauce

Barbecue was and still is central to a Juneteenth celebration, and we wouldn&rsquot expect anything less from a holiday that originated in Texas. Since we already know you&rsquore going to flex your skills on the grill, we found you the perfect barbeque sauce that can be used as a condiment or marinade. Brought to you by FoodNetwork stars, the Neely’s, Neely&rsquos BBQ Sauce recipe is great if you follow it to the letter, but it&rsquos even better if you make it your own.

Black-Eyed Pea Salad

While Black Americans traditionally eat black-eyed peas hot on New Year&rsquos Day to bring forth prosperity for the coming year, you can&rsquot go wrong with this light, salad version. Ingredients like fresh parsley and rice wine vinegar make it the perfect sidekick to your chicken or pork. Just make sure to make enough because this is not a time when less is more!


Why Red Food & Drinks Are Consumed on Juneteenth & 8 Recipes You Can Make at Home

When we hear the words Independence Day, most of us think of the 4th of July, the day America gained its freedom from Great Britain. But there&rsquos another Freedom Day that is not as well-known, though it holds even greater significance to many African Americans. Juneteenth, Freedom Day or even Jubilee Day is the day that Union General Gordon Granger read a federal order that would free the last enslaved people in Galveston, Texas, a good two years after the Emancipation Proclamation was signed. It became a joyous day to celebrate, first in Texas, and then in other parts of America as black people migrated.

Typical Juneteenth activities have included everything from prayer, parades, rodeos, fairs, educational lectures, musical performances and, of course, food (we&rsquoll get back to that in a sec). While Juneteenth has gained and lost popularity over the years, it&rsquos definitely experiencing a resurgence. Institutions such as the Smithsonian and the Henry Ford Museum have begun sponsoring Juneteenth activities, SheKnows, Twitter, Nike and the NFL have announced they will make Juneteenth a paid company holiday, and activists are campaigning for the United States Congress to recognize Juneteenth as a national holiday. Clearly, the political climate and rise of Black Lives Matter has given Juneteenth an even greater boost this year. Currently, there are over 275 events planned across the country, virtually and in-person, to serve as a show of Black love and resistance. Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam who is pushing to make it a holiday in his state explained recently, &ldquo(Juneteenth) matters now because it says to the black community, this is not just your history, this is everyone&rsquos shared history, and we recognize it together.” Yesssss.

Now, back to the food. You&rsquoll find soul food favorites like fried chicken, collard greens, and potato salad at any Juneteenth celebration, but it&rsquos the red rice, red sausage, red velvet cake and red fruit punch that really make it an official Juneteenth. The color red is said to represent the blood shed throughout enslavement, and some say it traces back to parts of West Africa where red drinks marked special occasions and red is symbolic of spiritual power.

With so many reasons to celebrate Juneteeth, what are you waiting for? Oh, wait, did I hear someone say, &lsquorecipes?&rsquo Don&rsquot worry, we got you covered. Here are some red food and drink recipes that are sure to make this Juneteenth fun for the entire family.

BBQ Sauce

Barbecue was and still is central to a Juneteenth celebration, and we wouldn&rsquot expect anything less from a holiday that originated in Texas. Since we already know you&rsquore going to flex your skills on the grill, we found you the perfect barbeque sauce that can be used as a condiment or marinade. Brought to you by FoodNetwork stars, the Neely’s, Neely&rsquos BBQ Sauce recipe is great if you follow it to the letter, but it&rsquos even better if you make it your own.

Black-Eyed Pea Salad

While Black Americans traditionally eat black-eyed peas hot on New Year&rsquos Day to bring forth prosperity for the coming year, you can&rsquot go wrong with this light, salad version. Ingredients like fresh parsley and rice wine vinegar make it the perfect sidekick to your chicken or pork. Just make sure to make enough because this is not a time when less is more!


Why Red Food & Drinks Are Consumed on Juneteenth & 8 Recipes You Can Make at Home

When we hear the words Independence Day, most of us think of the 4th of July, the day America gained its freedom from Great Britain. But there&rsquos another Freedom Day that is not as well-known, though it holds even greater significance to many African Americans. Juneteenth, Freedom Day or even Jubilee Day is the day that Union General Gordon Granger read a federal order that would free the last enslaved people in Galveston, Texas, a good two years after the Emancipation Proclamation was signed. It became a joyous day to celebrate, first in Texas, and then in other parts of America as black people migrated.

Typical Juneteenth activities have included everything from prayer, parades, rodeos, fairs, educational lectures, musical performances and, of course, food (we&rsquoll get back to that in a sec). While Juneteenth has gained and lost popularity over the years, it&rsquos definitely experiencing a resurgence. Institutions such as the Smithsonian and the Henry Ford Museum have begun sponsoring Juneteenth activities, SheKnows, Twitter, Nike and the NFL have announced they will make Juneteenth a paid company holiday, and activists are campaigning for the United States Congress to recognize Juneteenth as a national holiday. Clearly, the political climate and rise of Black Lives Matter has given Juneteenth an even greater boost this year. Currently, there are over 275 events planned across the country, virtually and in-person, to serve as a show of Black love and resistance. Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam who is pushing to make it a holiday in his state explained recently, &ldquo(Juneteenth) matters now because it says to the black community, this is not just your history, this is everyone&rsquos shared history, and we recognize it together.” Yesssss.

Now, back to the food. You&rsquoll find soul food favorites like fried chicken, collard greens, and potato salad at any Juneteenth celebration, but it&rsquos the red rice, red sausage, red velvet cake and red fruit punch that really make it an official Juneteenth. The color red is said to represent the blood shed throughout enslavement, and some say it traces back to parts of West Africa where red drinks marked special occasions and red is symbolic of spiritual power.

With so many reasons to celebrate Juneteeth, what are you waiting for? Oh, wait, did I hear someone say, &lsquorecipes?&rsquo Don&rsquot worry, we got you covered. Here are some red food and drink recipes that are sure to make this Juneteenth fun for the entire family.

BBQ Sauce

Barbecue was and still is central to a Juneteenth celebration, and we wouldn&rsquot expect anything less from a holiday that originated in Texas. Since we already know you&rsquore going to flex your skills on the grill, we found you the perfect barbeque sauce that can be used as a condiment or marinade. Brought to you by FoodNetwork stars, the Neely’s, Neely&rsquos BBQ Sauce recipe is great if you follow it to the letter, but it&rsquos even better if you make it your own.

Black-Eyed Pea Salad

While Black Americans traditionally eat black-eyed peas hot on New Year&rsquos Day to bring forth prosperity for the coming year, you can&rsquot go wrong with this light, salad version. Ingredients like fresh parsley and rice wine vinegar make it the perfect sidekick to your chicken or pork. Just make sure to make enough because this is not a time when less is more!


Why Red Food & Drinks Are Consumed on Juneteenth & 8 Recipes You Can Make at Home

When we hear the words Independence Day, most of us think of the 4th of July, the day America gained its freedom from Great Britain. But there&rsquos another Freedom Day that is not as well-known, though it holds even greater significance to many African Americans. Juneteenth, Freedom Day or even Jubilee Day is the day that Union General Gordon Granger read a federal order that would free the last enslaved people in Galveston, Texas, a good two years after the Emancipation Proclamation was signed. It became a joyous day to celebrate, first in Texas, and then in other parts of America as black people migrated.

Typical Juneteenth activities have included everything from prayer, parades, rodeos, fairs, educational lectures, musical performances and, of course, food (we&rsquoll get back to that in a sec). While Juneteenth has gained and lost popularity over the years, it&rsquos definitely experiencing a resurgence. Institutions such as the Smithsonian and the Henry Ford Museum have begun sponsoring Juneteenth activities, SheKnows, Twitter, Nike and the NFL have announced they will make Juneteenth a paid company holiday, and activists are campaigning for the United States Congress to recognize Juneteenth as a national holiday. Clearly, the political climate and rise of Black Lives Matter has given Juneteenth an even greater boost this year. Currently, there are over 275 events planned across the country, virtually and in-person, to serve as a show of Black love and resistance. Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam who is pushing to make it a holiday in his state explained recently, &ldquo(Juneteenth) matters now because it says to the black community, this is not just your history, this is everyone&rsquos shared history, and we recognize it together.” Yesssss.

Now, back to the food. You&rsquoll find soul food favorites like fried chicken, collard greens, and potato salad at any Juneteenth celebration, but it&rsquos the red rice, red sausage, red velvet cake and red fruit punch that really make it an official Juneteenth. The color red is said to represent the blood shed throughout enslavement, and some say it traces back to parts of West Africa where red drinks marked special occasions and red is symbolic of spiritual power.

With so many reasons to celebrate Juneteeth, what are you waiting for? Oh, wait, did I hear someone say, &lsquorecipes?&rsquo Don&rsquot worry, we got you covered. Here are some red food and drink recipes that are sure to make this Juneteenth fun for the entire family.

BBQ Sauce

Barbecue was and still is central to a Juneteenth celebration, and we wouldn&rsquot expect anything less from a holiday that originated in Texas. Since we already know you&rsquore going to flex your skills on the grill, we found you the perfect barbeque sauce that can be used as a condiment or marinade. Brought to you by FoodNetwork stars, the Neely’s, Neely&rsquos BBQ Sauce recipe is great if you follow it to the letter, but it&rsquos even better if you make it your own.

Black-Eyed Pea Salad

While Black Americans traditionally eat black-eyed peas hot on New Year&rsquos Day to bring forth prosperity for the coming year, you can&rsquot go wrong with this light, salad version. Ingredients like fresh parsley and rice wine vinegar make it the perfect sidekick to your chicken or pork. Just make sure to make enough because this is not a time when less is more!


Why Red Food & Drinks Are Consumed on Juneteenth & 8 Recipes You Can Make at Home

When we hear the words Independence Day, most of us think of the 4th of July, the day America gained its freedom from Great Britain. But there&rsquos another Freedom Day that is not as well-known, though it holds even greater significance to many African Americans. Juneteenth, Freedom Day or even Jubilee Day is the day that Union General Gordon Granger read a federal order that would free the last enslaved people in Galveston, Texas, a good two years after the Emancipation Proclamation was signed. It became a joyous day to celebrate, first in Texas, and then in other parts of America as black people migrated.

Typical Juneteenth activities have included everything from prayer, parades, rodeos, fairs, educational lectures, musical performances and, of course, food (we&rsquoll get back to that in a sec). While Juneteenth has gained and lost popularity over the years, it&rsquos definitely experiencing a resurgence. Institutions such as the Smithsonian and the Henry Ford Museum have begun sponsoring Juneteenth activities, SheKnows, Twitter, Nike and the NFL have announced they will make Juneteenth a paid company holiday, and activists are campaigning for the United States Congress to recognize Juneteenth as a national holiday. Clearly, the political climate and rise of Black Lives Matter has given Juneteenth an even greater boost this year. Currently, there are over 275 events planned across the country, virtually and in-person, to serve as a show of Black love and resistance. Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam who is pushing to make it a holiday in his state explained recently, &ldquo(Juneteenth) matters now because it says to the black community, this is not just your history, this is everyone&rsquos shared history, and we recognize it together.” Yesssss.

Now, back to the food. You&rsquoll find soul food favorites like fried chicken, collard greens, and potato salad at any Juneteenth celebration, but it&rsquos the red rice, red sausage, red velvet cake and red fruit punch that really make it an official Juneteenth. The color red is said to represent the blood shed throughout enslavement, and some say it traces back to parts of West Africa where red drinks marked special occasions and red is symbolic of spiritual power.

With so many reasons to celebrate Juneteeth, what are you waiting for? Oh, wait, did I hear someone say, &lsquorecipes?&rsquo Don&rsquot worry, we got you covered. Here are some red food and drink recipes that are sure to make this Juneteenth fun for the entire family.

BBQ Sauce

Barbecue was and still is central to a Juneteenth celebration, and we wouldn&rsquot expect anything less from a holiday that originated in Texas. Since we already know you&rsquore going to flex your skills on the grill, we found you the perfect barbeque sauce that can be used as a condiment or marinade. Brought to you by FoodNetwork stars, the Neely’s, Neely&rsquos BBQ Sauce recipe is great if you follow it to the letter, but it&rsquos even better if you make it your own.

Black-Eyed Pea Salad

While Black Americans traditionally eat black-eyed peas hot on New Year&rsquos Day to bring forth prosperity for the coming year, you can&rsquot go wrong with this light, salad version. Ingredients like fresh parsley and rice wine vinegar make it the perfect sidekick to your chicken or pork. Just make sure to make enough because this is not a time when less is more!


Why Red Food & Drinks Are Consumed on Juneteenth & 8 Recipes You Can Make at Home

When we hear the words Independence Day, most of us think of the 4th of July, the day America gained its freedom from Great Britain. But there&rsquos another Freedom Day that is not as well-known, though it holds even greater significance to many African Americans. Juneteenth, Freedom Day or even Jubilee Day is the day that Union General Gordon Granger read a federal order that would free the last enslaved people in Galveston, Texas, a good two years after the Emancipation Proclamation was signed. It became a joyous day to celebrate, first in Texas, and then in other parts of America as black people migrated.

Typical Juneteenth activities have included everything from prayer, parades, rodeos, fairs, educational lectures, musical performances and, of course, food (we&rsquoll get back to that in a sec). While Juneteenth has gained and lost popularity over the years, it&rsquos definitely experiencing a resurgence. Institutions such as the Smithsonian and the Henry Ford Museum have begun sponsoring Juneteenth activities, SheKnows, Twitter, Nike and the NFL have announced they will make Juneteenth a paid company holiday, and activists are campaigning for the United States Congress to recognize Juneteenth as a national holiday. Clearly, the political climate and rise of Black Lives Matter has given Juneteenth an even greater boost this year. Currently, there are over 275 events planned across the country, virtually and in-person, to serve as a show of Black love and resistance. Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam who is pushing to make it a holiday in his state explained recently, &ldquo(Juneteenth) matters now because it says to the black community, this is not just your history, this is everyone&rsquos shared history, and we recognize it together.” Yesssss.

Now, back to the food. You&rsquoll find soul food favorites like fried chicken, collard greens, and potato salad at any Juneteenth celebration, but it&rsquos the red rice, red sausage, red velvet cake and red fruit punch that really make it an official Juneteenth. The color red is said to represent the blood shed throughout enslavement, and some say it traces back to parts of West Africa where red drinks marked special occasions and red is symbolic of spiritual power.

With so many reasons to celebrate Juneteeth, what are you waiting for? Oh, wait, did I hear someone say, &lsquorecipes?&rsquo Don&rsquot worry, we got you covered. Here are some red food and drink recipes that are sure to make this Juneteenth fun for the entire family.

BBQ Sauce

Barbecue was and still is central to a Juneteenth celebration, and we wouldn&rsquot expect anything less from a holiday that originated in Texas. Since we already know you&rsquore going to flex your skills on the grill, we found you the perfect barbeque sauce that can be used as a condiment or marinade. Brought to you by FoodNetwork stars, the Neely’s, Neely&rsquos BBQ Sauce recipe is great if you follow it to the letter, but it&rsquos even better if you make it your own.

Black-Eyed Pea Salad

While Black Americans traditionally eat black-eyed peas hot on New Year&rsquos Day to bring forth prosperity for the coming year, you can&rsquot go wrong with this light, salad version. Ingredients like fresh parsley and rice wine vinegar make it the perfect sidekick to your chicken or pork. Just make sure to make enough because this is not a time when less is more!


Watch the video: Food and drinks vocabulary (May 2022).